Plant used for/Stimulant

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Please add more about plants that are used for Stimulant here!

Stimulant
Excites or quickens activity of the physiological processes. Faster acting than a tonic but differing from a narcotic in that it does not give a false sense of well-being.

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Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for plants that are used as Stimulant:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
9Astragalus; Huang-qiFabaceaeAstragalus membranaceus (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-28 00:00:0080 each seeds in plant21Scarify seed lightly, and use rhizobium inoculant. Direct seed in early spring. Good cold soil germinator and a poor warm soil germinator. Germ in 3 to 10 days. Thin to 6 inches apart.

Seed best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. A period of cold stratification may help stored seed to germinate. Stored seed, and perhaps also fresh seed, should be pre-soaked for 24 hours in hot water before sowing - but make sure that you do not cook the seed. Any seed that does not swell should be carefully pricked with a needle, taking care not to damage the embryo, and re-soaked for a further 24 hours.

Germination can be slow and erratic but is usually within 4 - 9 weeks or more at 13°c if the seed is treated or sown fresh.

As soon as it is large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter, planting them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.
1460Plant is a sturdy survivor, and prefers full sun, average soil, and good drainage.

Requires a dry well-drained soil in a sunny position. Prefers a sandy slightly alkaline soil. Plants are hardy to at least -15°c.

Plants are intolerant of root disturbance and are best planted in their final positions whilst still small. Many members of this genus can be difficult to grow, this may be due partly to a lack of their specific bacterial associations in the soil.
full sunwell drainedsandy50 eachTaprooted herbaceous perennial native to China.

King of tonic herbs. It is an anabolic immunostimulant, that may be dried and ground up, then used for making tea, decoction, or tincture. As a fresh root, may be boiled in soup to release its life-supportive essence.

Plants flower yellow-white to 4 feet tall.

Huang Qi is commonly used in Chinese herbalism, where it is considered to be one of the 50 fundamental herbs.

The root is a sweet tonic herb that stimulates the immune system and many organs of the body, whilst lowering blood pressure and blood sugar levels. It is particularly suited to young, physically active people, increasing stamina and endurance and improving resistance to the cold - indeed for younger people it is perhaps superior to ginseng in this respect.

Huang Qi is used especially for treatment of the kidneys and also to avoid senility. The plant is often used in conjunction with other herbs such as Atractylodes macrocephala and Ledebouriella seseloides.

The root contains a number of bio-active constituents including saponins and isoflavonoids.

It is used in the treatment of cancer, prolapse of the uterus or anus, abscesses and chronic ulcers, chronic nephritis with oedema and proteinuria. Recent research in the West has shown that the root can increase the production of interferon and macrophages and thus help restore normal immune function in cancer patients. Patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy recover faster and live longer if given Huang Qi concurrently.

The root of 4 year old plants is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use.
NitrogenAdaptogen, Antibacterial, Cancer, Cardiotonic, Diuretic, Febrifuge, Hypoglycaemic, Hypotensive, Immunostimulant, 267Autumn Olive; Autumn Berry, Silverberry, Aki-Gumi, OleasterElaeagnaceaeElaeagnus umbellata (dg fo pf wp)2015-01-17 00:00:0013 each cuttings in greenhouse soilplantSeed: sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. It should germinate in late winter or early spring, though it may take 18 months. Stored seed can be very slow to germinate, often taking more than 18 months. A warm stratification for 4 weeks followed by 12 weeks cold stratification can help. The seed usually (eventually) germinates quite well.


Cuttings: half-ripe wood, 7 - 10cm with a heel, July/August in a frame. Good percentage. Cuttings of mature wood of the current year's growth, 10 - 12cm with a heel, November in a frame. Leave for 12 months. Fair to good percentage.

Layering: September/October. Takes 12 months.

Plants can fruit in 6 years from seed.

An excellent companion plant, when grown in orchards it can increase yields from the fruit trees by up to 10%.
full sunwell drainedpoorFruit: edible raw or cooked. Juicy and pleasantly acid, they are tasty raw and can also be made into jams, preserves etc. The fruit must be fully ripe before it can be enjoyed raw, if even slightly under-ripe it will be quite astringent. The fruit contains about 8.3% sugars, 4.5% protein, 1% ash. The vitamin C content is about 12mg per 100g. Mature bushes in the wild yield about 650g of fruit over 2 - 3 pickings. The harvested fruit stores for about 15 days at room temperature. The fruit is about 8mm in diameter and contains a single large seed.

Seed: edible raw or cooked. It can be eaten with the fruit though the seed case is rather fibrous.


The flowers are astringent, cardiac and stimulant.

The seeds are used as a stimulant in the treatment of coughs.

The expressed oil from the seeds is used in the treatment of pulmonary affections.

The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers.

Very tolerant of maritime exposure, it makes a good informal hedge, succeeding even in very exposed positions. The plants make a reasonable wind-protecting screen, they are about as wide as they are tall. They make a good companion hedge, enriching the soil and fertilizing neighbouring plants. The wood is a good fuel.
Antioxidants, Lycopene, Nitrogen, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin EAstringent, Beverage, Cancer, Cardiac, Food, Fuel, Hedge, Pectoral, 16Bayberry; Candleberry MyrtleMyricaceaeMyrica cerifera (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-20 00:00:00otherSow in outdoor nursery bed or outdoor flats in the fall, winter, or very early spring, or cold- condition 6 weeks. Scarify before planting by rubbing on medium grit sandpaper. Space trees at least 15 feet apart.Plant prefers full sun.full sun50 eachPerennial, dioecious, evergreen shrub to small tree to 25 feet. Native to the southern US.

The root bark is a valuable stimulating astringent employed for treating diarrhea and dysentery. Bayberry root bark powder is an oldtime apothecary item.

The wax that surrounds the seeds is a high grade plant wax that burns clear -- aromatic to the max.
Antibacterial, Astringent, Dye, Emetic, Fragrance, Hedge, Narcotic, Oil, Sternutatory,
17Bilberry; Blaeberry; Whortleberry; FraughanEricaceaeVaccinium myrtillus (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-24 00:00:00240 each seeds in plantSoak berries in water overnight, smash them, and remove the seeds. The easiest way to do this is to put the berries in a jar, pour water over them, let them sit over night, then in the morning pour through a sieve, smash the berries inside the sieve, then put the mashed berries in a bowl or small bucket of water, stir them around in the water, at which point the flesh will float and the seeds will sink. Pour off the majority of the water and the flesh of the berries, then in the very end pour the water and the seeds into a sieve that is lined with a paper towel. Allow this to drain, and you will now have the seeds on the paper towel, and you can proceed to scoop them up and plant them. Use your fingers or a spoon. Sow in fall or very early spring in outdoor conditions, in pots or flats, and expect germination in the spring. Alternatively, you may wish to remove the seeds from the fruits and then mix the seeds in moist medium in a sealed plastic bag or jar in the refrigerator (not the freezer) for 90 days, then remove from fridge and sow. The best conditions for germination are cool, moist shade. We find that this method is pretty reliable. Sow seeds in acid loam medium. Grow out in a shaded place in pots for a year before transplanting to final location. Bilberries prefer to grow in acidic loam soil.poor50 eachShort woody shrub growing in acidic, nutrient poor and subarctic soils throughout the world. Among all the closely related anthocyanin containing berries (including blueberries and huckleberries), bilberries are considered most potent, promoting night vision, improving vascular health and for treating macular degeneration.Antiemetic, Antiseptic, Astringent, Diuretic, Hypoglycaemic, Kidney, Ophthalmic, Tonic
23Cilantro; Coriander; Thai ParsleyApiaceaeCoriandrum sativum (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-07 00:00:00520 each seeds in plantSow directly in the garden bed. Germination can be a bit cranky, so be patient. Sow starting in the early spring, in successions 3 weeks apart, in order to assure ongoing availability of the fresh herb.30Plant prefers full sun and regular garden soil.full sungarden200 eachAnnual. 30 days to cilantro, 60 days to coriander.

Harvest the shining, smooth leaves before the plant flowers for use as the culinary spice Cilantro in cooking and in salsa. Harvest the seeds and use them as Coriander, a curry ingredient and also a respected medicinal herb.

Medicinally, the fresh or dried herb and seeds chelate heavy metals and help move them out of the body—this includes mercury and lead. The seeds are especially stimulant, aromatic and carminative. Combine fresh green coriander seeds with spilanthes buds and extract together in alcohol for a mouthwash experience that surpasses everything with the possible exception of a crisp ripe apple right off the tree. Interestingly, we invented this combination spontaneously and only later found out that coriander helps the body chelate mercury that might be seeping from old fillings.

RECIPE FOR CHELATION SALSA Here’s our recipe for “Chelation Salsa” 2 cups chopped fresh cilantro 2 cups chopped fresh tomato 1 cup chopped fresh basil ½ cup chopped pumpkin seeds 4 cloves garlic, chopped and pressed Hot peppers to taste 1 TBS lemon juice 2 TBS olive oil

Salt to taste
Carminative, Seasoning, Stimulant
293Clover, whiteFabaceaeTrifolium reptans (dg fo pf wp)Seeds: Pre-soak for 12 hours in warm water and then sow in spring in situ. If the seed is in short supply it might be better to sow it in pots in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in late spring.

Division: in spring[238].

Succeeds in a moist, well-drained circum-neutral soil in full sun, preferring a sweet calcareous clay soil.

Succeeds in poor soils.

Dislikes growing with henbane or members of the buttercup family[18]. Buttercups growing nearby depress the growth of the nitrogen bacteria by means of a root exudate[201].

It grows well in an apple orchard, the trees will produce tastier fruit that stores better[201].

It should not be grown with camellias or gooseberries because it harbours a mite that can cause fruit drop in the gooseberries and premature budding in the camellias[201].

Polymorphic, there are many subspecies and varieties. Some varieties have also been selected for use in lawn mixes[183].

This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[200].
Grassland and lawns, preferring a calcareous clay soil[9, 17].full sunwell drainedclay3500 gramsA very important food plant for the caterpillars of many butterfly and moth species[30] it is also a good bee plant[54]. A good companion plant in the lawn, tolerating trampling[18, 54].NitrogenAntirheumatic, Antiscrophulatic, Beverage, Depurative, Detergent, Food, Green manure, Ophthalmic, 10Codonopsis; Dang-shenCampanulaceaeCodonopsis pilosula (dg fo pf wp)7Sow in spring. Watch out for gophers, these roots are tastier than carrots!

Do not allow the compost to dry out. The seed usually germinates in 1 - 6 weeks at 20°c. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer and protect them from slugs until the plants are well established.

DIVISION in spring, with care, since the plant resents root disturbance. We have found it best to take small divisions that are teased out from the sides of the main clump so as to cause the least possible disturbance to the plants and to avoid having to dig up the clump. These small divisions need to be potted up and placed in light shade in a greenhouse until they are rooting well. They can be planted out into their permanent positions in the summer if they are large enough, otherwise in the following spring.
Plant prefers full sun to part shade and something to climb on -- preferably another plant but lacking that at least a string.sun or partial shadewell drainedgarden100 eachTwining and vining perennial native to China.

"Poor Man's Ginseng" builds chi and tonifys the blood. A fascinating climbing plant with bell-shaped blossoms. The roots are crunchy, very sweet, quite delicious. The herb in TCM is the pressed and dried, rolled root that is sugary and chewy. Highly recommended.

Adaptogen, Appetizer, Digestive, Galactogogue, Sialagogue, Stomachic, Tonic
24Echinacea; Purple ConeflowerAsteraceaeEchinacea purpurea (dg fo pf wp)2013-05-22 00:00:0060 each seeds in plantSow seed in the early spring in flats outdoors or in the greenhouse, and transplant seedlings out to the garden or field in mid-spring (middle of May in our area). Starting earlier, and transplanting twice into progressively bigger containers will result in a much better rooted transplant, which will probably flower in the first year. It is fairly easy to seed this plant directly in the garden or field. Sow the seed shallowly in the early to mid-spring. Keep moist. Once the plants are up, you must stay on top of the weeds, and thin to 1 foot spacing after the second set of leaves has formed. E. purpurea likes full sun, plenty of water, and rich, limey soil. This is the species best suited to varied growing conditions, whether coastal or mountain, east or west. It is easy to grow, and produces on the average 1/2 pound of fresh root by the dormant period following the second year of growth. Plant 1 foot apart. Flowers 3 to 4 feet tall.Does well in pots.full sunmoist200 eachHardy to all temperate zones.

Herbaceous perennial prairie dweller. Originally native to a wide band stretching from Michigan south to Louisiana, then west to Texas and Oklahoma, but currently uncommon in the wild. Widely cultivated. Does well in pots. Our strain was derived from a rare wild collection and has been successfully and profitably cultivated for years here in the Williams Valley of Southern Oregon. It has not been intentionally modified or hybridized in any way from the original source, and therefore contains the rich spectrum of active chemicals found in the original wild plant.

Medical activity as per E. angustifolia.

On a plant-protection note, please consider that growing and using E. purpurea also takes the strain off wild populations of E. angustifolia.

Some discussion on using Echinacea in herbal therapy:

I find personally that the herb works best as a tincture of the fresh root, used at first sign of the common cold, flu, or indeed any kind of infection. The public wisdom is that Echinacea stimulates the immune system, and that this is the mode of action. The herb almost certainly stimulates the activity of the macrophages and killer T cells as it speeds the bodie's recognition of antigens. According to my teacher (may he rest in peace) Michael Moore, who seemed to have a knack for recognizing these things, the use of Echinacea in the early stages of (any) infection speeds the body response by 24 hours. That means that the use of Echinacea should shorten the period of infection (ie how long you have a cold) by 24 hours. Or, if used quickly enough and in large enough doses, it may keep you from getting sick. "Ward off contagion," as the ancients used to say. A headcold is the inflammation of the sinus membrane -- if you can reduce that inflammation with Echinacea (and snort a little dilute goldenseal tincture, too, for that matter) then you can convince yourself, perhaps, that you don't have a cold at all. Or reduce the symptoms, anyway. Increase the comfort factor.

Regarding the "hyaluronidase effect," Echinacea seems to clarify the interstitial fluids, softening the cartilage, helping remove metabolic waste products by way of the lymph. Echinacea can also be used for treating stretched ligaments and inflamed joints (tendonitis, for example). Generally in this case a high dosage is prescribed, and the use of the joint in question is limited, and the pain and inflammation is reduced.

As for using Echinacea if you have Aids or are HIV positive or suffer from any other autoimmune disease, then be careful, as Echinacea can exaggerate acute autoimmune episodes.

Echinacea tincture can be mixed with ground pharmaceutical grade charcoal and clay and applied to insect stings to help resolve them more quickly. This is a usage well documented in the Native American ethnologies. And, you can use it for treating brown recluse bites -- it will help limit erosion of healthy tissue and necrosis.
Immunostimulant
7Ephedra; Ma-HuangEphedraceaeEphedra sinica, sinensis (dg fo pf wp)2013-05-22 00:00:0060 each seeds in plant11The seed is easy to germinate in a warm, sandy medium. Strew the seed on surface of very sandy potting soil (50% sand) and barely cover with more of the same potting soil. Tamp securely and keep evenly moist until germination, which in the greenhouse or under propagation lights should take about 11 days. If you are trying to do this outside in the garden it might take longer, as cold nights will prolong germination times. Basically you want to provide as much control as possible (ie plant in flats, not in the garden dirt) because the seedlings are small and you need to work them up to about 4 inches before transplanting. After germination, back off on the watering because the young seedlings can easily damp off -- this is a desert plant. 127Does well in pots. We grow the plants in a sand mulch, about 4 inches thick, in the full sun, with moderate watering. They create, in 2 or 3 years, a stubby, woody trunk bristling with the jointed stems. Cold hardy. Note on germination: Seed gave 80% germination in 11 days at 65 degrees F.full sunwell drained50 eachPerennial, primitive shrub. Native to the steppes of north and northwestern China. Rare offering of the main official species. Does well in pots.

Dried stem is a natural adrenergic stimulant to the central nervous system and a bronchodilator for treating colds and asthma. The whole herb, dried and used in small doses, poses no threat to the health. However, the very young, the very old, and the pregnant mother would best avoid using this stimulating herb.

Ma-huang prefers full sun and dry, sandy soils.

The flower is inconspicuous, but the fruits are quite fascinating -- fleshy scales adhered together at the end of the branch, colored orange, gooey and mucilagenous, and very sweet to the taste, containing the paired seeds with their flattened sides lightly clasped together.

More notes: There's a reason why Ephedra sinica is the official herb used for making the Chinese medicine Ma-huang. It has high concentrations of the various Ephedrine alkaloids and it has them in the naturally balanced state. It's a whole herb, and can be used in the form of the dried "stems" as a tea. The tea is used as a bronchial dilator -- very helpful for asthmatics, and like coffee, gently stimulating to the CNS (central nervous system). Its not dangerous when used at reasonable dosage (a cup or two) as an herbal tea. When the Ephedrine is concentrated (made into a drug, no longer an herb) then it can certainly be dangerous. We're suggesting using the herb in the traditional manner, at reasonable dosage, not as a white powdered concentrate that can overstimulate the heart!

In any form, Ma-huang is not a good herb to use if you are pregnant, nursing, very young, very old, or with a preexisting heart condition. Prudence is recommended! Other sources of Ma-huang also contain alot of Ephedrine alkaloids. In general, Ephedra sinica has a higher total alkaloid content than the other species. Ephedra equisitina is higher in Ephedrine than pseudoephedrine. Ephedra intermedia is higher in pseudoephedrine than ephedrine. Ephedrine levels may vary according to how old the plants are, where they are grown, when the seed is harvested, how the herb is processes, whether the nodes are used or not, how long the dried herb has been stored, etc. etc. Our plants are starters only. You can't make a useable quantity of dried herb off of them because they are too small -- the plants need to be planted out in a good situation and grown out for a couple of years before they get big enough to harvest.
Bronchiodilator, Stimulant
49Maca, Red; Maca RojoBrassicaceaeLepidium peruvianum (dg fo pf wp)6Sow the seed on the surface of the seed bed, stir it around with your fingers, then tamp in securely. Thin to 6 inch spacing, and harvest after the first year of growth. For most localities, best to direct-seed in September and harvest in May or so, but if your winters are very snowy I don't think this will probably work. In the case of snowy winters (zone 6 and under) I would plant this as a quick fall or spring crop and harvest small roots. We planted MACA for three years before we worked out a reasonable scenario and took in our first good roots, then a seed crop. Also, anything of this nature depends on the weather patterns of the year in question. As always, we encourage experimentation and the feedback we're getting is encouraging -- positive reports have been received from New Jersey, Santa Cruz and North Dakota. As my teacher always said, "Keep trying."The plant is very tolerant of high intensity sunlight and withstands drastic temperature fluctuations. Plant prefers fall, winter and spring conditions for growth. Full sun and a fast-draining soil is preferred. Maca likes a somewhat alkaline soil, such as decomposed granite or volcanic soils. However, lacking this kind of soil, regular garden soil will do. Composted manures are a good fertilizer for MACA. I don't think the plant will overwinter in less than zone 6, unless perhaps in very dry sites or protected alpine locations. Here in Williams we get very little snow, and the plant grows through the winter, which is preferred, as it gives the plants time to mature, and encourages bulbing (the hypocotyl). If left in the field for 2 years, the root will become quite woody and the plant will go to seed. Probably the best regions for growing maca are high steppes in tropical or subtropical countries, although it is worthwhile to try planting almost anywhere because very little is known about the potential adaptability. All plantings will be experimental until reasonable methodology and timing are worked out.full sunwell drainedgarden100 eachBiennial, radish-like, rosette forming plant native to the high Peruvian Puna. This is a high elevation cultivar that is considered to be medicinally superior to other strains.

The first photo is of a seedling that was direct-seeded outdoors. The new seed is extremely viable and vigorous, giving over 90% germination in 6 days.

Second photo shows the red-purple coloration of the root, which is still at the stage prior to formation of bulbous hypocotyl.
Calcium, Carbohydrate, Iodine, Iron, ProteinAdaptogen, Aphrodisiac, Cancer, Food, Infertility, Nutritive, Tonic
57Pepper, African Bird; Pilipili Hoho; Pilipili Kichaa; African Bird Peppers; Birdseye Pepper; Pequin; Piquin; PenguinSolanaceaeCapsicum frutescens (dg fo pf wp)8Start indoors 40 to 50 days prior to the last frost. Thin seedlings to at least 2 inches apart in the flat. Transplant out to garden after the soil has really warmed up. We grow ours in a cloche even in the summer, as cold nights can set them back. The best compost for peppers is higher in phosphorous than nitrogen. Kelp is well-tolerated and makes for outrageous yields.170Peppers prefer a scanty, even water supply, good drainage, full sun, and a long, hot summer. Excellent choice for greenhouse pepper growers or folks growing peppers in the South or Gulf States, as well as in the tropics.full sunwell drained180,000 Scoville Heat Units. Perennial bush pepper. 170 days to maturity, best yields in the second year. These are grown by us on our farm here in Southern Oregon, the culmination of a long learning in the subject of African peppers. The plant itself is comely, 4 feet tall and with a flat top, leaves light green. Peppers are tiny, fiery hot, thin-skinned and easily dried, green at first, turning bright red at maturity (see pictures).

One of the primary reasons for my last trip to Zanzibar was to find a reputable and viable source of "bird peppers." These peppers find their way into local cuisine, to flavor samosas and curries, and they are used worldwide for making sauces, vinegars and medicinal compounds. The flavor is citrusy, smoky, and nutty (if you can get past the incredible hotness of them). Clearly, one way to get past the hotness and appreciate these peppers is to use them sparingly in cuisine -- a little goes a long way!

Medicinally, bird peppers are potently anticarcinogenic, warming, carminative, digestive, and stimulating. Tiny, fiery hot, thin-skinned and easily dried.
Carminative, Ornamental, Seasoning, Stimulant
82Pumpkin, Styrian Hull-lessCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)2013-06-01 00:00:0018 each starts in outdoor soiltransplantPrepare the hill or the bed with plenty of aged manure or compost, direct-seed the seeds, and choose the three best seedlings from the hill (or if row cropping, thin to 1 plant every 3 feet). Keep weeded and watered. Vines will soon become self-mulching.90full sunrich30 eachThis is a unique pumpkin cultivar developed in the provice of Styria in Austria.

We have been thinking about the challenge of finding ways that people can grow protein-rich foods in temperated gardens with high yield for the effort and without the need for a lot of processing. Our search lead us eventually to the naked seeded pumpkin (so-called hull-less or Styrian pumpkins). These pumpkins have a seed that is encased only in a thin membrane, which may be consumed along with the seed. The seeds can be lightly toasted with a little salt or eaten raw and uncooked.

This is a convenient protein source, a good snack or addition to smoothies or salads, rich in unsaturated fat, an immune tonic and tonic to the reproductive organs of both females and males. Consumption of the seed is a specific for treating benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) as well as prostate cancer.

These pumpkins are all about the seeds -- the flesh itself is low sugar and not particularly tasty. They make good goat food. So back to being after the seeds, which are a great protein source, we obtained some nice open-pollinated seed of this plant and grew a large patch of it this year. The plant turned out to be problem-free, fast-growing and a rewardingly prolific producer of the large fruits.

Harvest and processing: Harvest pumpkins after first frost, split open and scoop out seeds and spaghetti onto a table screen. Using your hands and a garden hose, work the mash and water it down until the seeds are free of spaghetti. Scoop up the seeds and air dry them on screens, stirring several times per day, until the seeds are dry and stable. Store in paper bags.
PotassiumAnthelmintic, Food, Forage, Immunostimulant, Oil, Veterinary
11Sage, Chinese Red; Tan-shen; Dan-shenLamiaceaeSalvia miltiorrhiza (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-28 00:00:0057 each seeds in plantSow in fast-draining soil in the full sun. Gratifyingly easy germinator -- sow in spring and work up in pots before transplanting to the landscape. Mulch heavily to overwinter, unless you're in Santa Barbara...full sunwell drained20 eachHerbaceous perennial native to Manchuria. This is the official species.

One of the best circulation enhancing herbs. Known as a non-enervating stimulant, it improves blood flow to the extremities without compromising the adrenals. Helps move stuck blood as in atherosclerosis or menstrual woes. I went to a conference where a well-known practitioner of acupuncture said, "This is my favorite Chinese herb and everyone should be taking it." Although my opinion varies somewhat from this statement, still I consider Dan-shen to be an excellent herb for addressing poor circulation issues and also for prevention of stroke, even in individuals who are at high risk of stroke or who have already endured one of these frightening and often debilitating episodes.

Finally, the herb itself is comely, and the roots, as shown in the photo I took for the webpage, look like veins, being bright red, and are an obvious signature of the herb's activity. Excellent choice for herb gardens throughout the temperate north and a show plant for sure.
Ornamental, Stimulant, Vasodilator
62Rhodiola, Alpine; Golden Root; Rose RootCrassulaceaeRhodiola rosea (dg fo pf wp)42Germination benefits greatly from cold conditioning/stratification, possibly ~ 6 weeks at 5 Celcius or colder, though typically seed is sown on moist sterilized potting soil (in plugtrays - 72 cell trays are popular) during the winter and placed outside for two months or more, preferably with snow cover. Seeds can be covered lightly or pressed into the soil surface, but should not be buried too deeply or allowed to dry out completely. In Canada, sprouts appear in late April or early May, after daytime temperatures increase, and can withstand significant frosts. Alternatively, strategies which utilize or mimic ethylene gas may also promote germination. Young seedlings grow slowly, and do better in a location semi-sheltered from sun and wind. They grow slowly, suffering both when the soil remains saturated with moisture for extended periods and when the soil becomes very dry. Thus a balance between overwatering and drought conditions should be maintained. Mild fertilization may be beneficial, but is not required. After a month or two, when a stalk is sent up from the rosette of seed leaves, seedlings can be exposed to more sun to maximize growth. Seedlings can be transplanted in their first year, but can also be kept in plugtrays for a year or two to minimize weeding in the field. Excellent transplant survival rates can be achieved any time the ground is not frozen, even with dormant (leafless) plugs in the fall. Eventually plant growth will suffer if seedlings are not planted out. -- GORDON STEINRATHS127Ideal growing site components include full or almost full sun, good drainage during the spring runoff and some shelter from the wind. While the latter is not imperitive, it will help conserve soil moisture and enhance growth. R. rosea is very drought tolerant and does not require irrigation, however, it will benefit from regular watering - natural or otherwise. Field spacing depends on the chosen weed control system, especially if plastic mulch is used. One foot in-row spacing, with eight-inch between-row spacing of plants is an average for current trials, giving three to four rows of plants per (mulched) bed. Path spacing between beds will vary with the weeding regime, or a solid (pathless) planting may be prefered.sun or partial shademoist100 eachPerennial, fleshy succulent. Rhodiola rosea is quite variable depending on origin. This seed originated from Austria and Germany, and the photo is characteristic of its form. The dried roots are rose-scented, loaded with immune stimulating glycosides (e.g. rosavin, rosin). Uplifting adaptogenic properties similar to Eleuthero Ginseng. Rhodiola does best at elevation and in the North.

Time to harvest can be as short as three growing seasons, when roots can attain 0.75% rosavin content or better, though four to five year's growth will provide greater root biomass and a rosavin content of 1% or more. The roots tend to deteriorate from within as they age, harboring patches of necrotic tissue (or "heartrot") to which they will eventually succumb. The upshot is that - while there may be 75-year old plants in the wild - the maximum age of a commercial field may only be six or seven years. The dynamics of root attrition due to disease are not yet understood, and may differ with various cultivars and soil conditions. Initial indications are that fertilization is not benificial under normal conditions.

R. rosea is an adaptable species, and as such appears to do well in a variety of soil types, from rocky gravel through heavy clay to silty, sandy and peaty loam soil types. The relationship between soil pH and rosavin levels is presently poorly understood, but may favor acidity - ? As a circumpolar species, Rhodiola does well at high latitudes, where its production of rosavins assists survival under harsh conditions. How it performs in warmer climates will be an interesting experiment.
Adaptogen, Antidepressant, Immunostimulant
64Rhodiola, Russian; Golden Root; Rose RootCrassulaceaeRhodiola rosea (dg fo pf wp)42Germination benefits greatly from cold conditioning/stratification, possibly ~ 6 weeks at 5 Celcius or colder, though typically seed is sown on moist sterilized potting soil (in plugtrays - 72 cell trays are popular) during the winter and placed outside for two months or more, preferably with snow cover. Seeds can be covered lightly or pressed into the soil surface, but should not be buried too deeply or allowed to dry out completely. In Canada, sprouts appear in late April or early May, after daytime temperatures increase, and can withstand significant frosts. Alternatively, strategies which utilize or mimic ethylene gas may also promote germination. Young seedlings grow slowly, and do better in a location semi-sheltered from sun and wind. They grow slowly, suffering both when the soil remains saturated with moisture for extended periods and when the soil becomes very dry. Thus a balance between overwatering and drought conditions should be maintained. Mild fertilization may be beneficial, but is not required. After a month or two, when a stalk is sent up from the rosette of seed leaves, seedlings can be exposed to more sun to maximize growth. Seedlings can be transplanted in their first year, but can also be kept in plugtrays for a year or two to minimize weeding in the field. Excellent transplant survival rates can be achieved any time the ground is not frozen, even with dormant (leafless) plugs in the fall. Eventually plant growth will suffer if seedlings are not planted out. -- GORDON STEINRATHS127Ideal growing site components include full or almost full sun, good drainage during the spring runoff and some shelter from the wind. While the latter is not imperitive, it will help conserve soil moisture and enhance growth. R. rosea is very drought tolerant and does not require irrigation, however, it will benefit from regular watering - natural or otherwise. Field spacing depends on the chosen weed control system, especially if plastic mulch is used. One foot in-row spacing, with eight-inch between-row spacing of plants is an average for current trials, giving three to four rows of plants per (mulched) bed. Path spacing between beds will vary with the weeding regime, or a solid (pathless) planting may be prefered.sun or partial shademoist100 eachPerennial, fleshy succulent. Rhodiola rosea is quite variable depending on location. This seed was collected in Russia. The dried roots are rose-scented, loaded with immune stimulating glycosides (e.g. rosavin, rosin). Uplifting adaptogenic properties similar to Eleuthero Ginseng. Prefers limey soil or rock garden. Not very heat tolerant. Flowers to 10 inches.

Time to harvest can be as short as three growing seasons, when roots can attain 0.75% rosavin content or better, though four to five year's growth will provide greater root biomass and a rosavin content of 1% or more. The roots tend to deteriorate from within as they age, harboring patches of necrotic tissue (or "heartrot") to which they will eventually succumb. The upshot is that - while there may be 75-year old plants in the wild - the maximum age of a commercial field may only be six or seven years. The dynamics of root attrition due to disease are not yet understood, and may differ with various cultivars and soil conditions. Initial indications are that fertilization is not benificial under normal conditions.

R. rosea is an adaptable species, and as such appears to do well in a variety of soil types, from rocky gravel through heavy clay to silty, sandy and peaty loam soil types. The relationship between soil pH and rosavin levels is presently poorly understood, but may favor acidity - ? As a circumpolar species, Rhodiola does well at high latitudes, where its production of rosavins assists survival under harsh conditions. How it performs in warmer climates will be an interesting experiment.
Adaptogen, Antidepressant, Immunostimulant
67Sea BuckthornElaeagnaceaeHippophae rhamnoides (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-30 00:00:0032 each seeds in plant14Scarify seeds and sow in warm, sandy soil. Germination is in 2 weeks or so -- a dependable and fun germinator. Space 10 or more feet apart.20 eachDioecious, spiny shrub to small tree. Native to temperate Europe and Asia. All zones. The tree, even when young and bush-like, is excellent in hedgerows and shelterbelts. The fruit juice is loaded with vitamins, amino acids and antioxidants; improves immune response. Oil of seeds is an effective sunblock.NitrogenFood, Immunostimulant
63Rhodiola, Scandanavian; Golden Root; Rose RootCrassulaceaeRhodiola rosea (dg fo pf wp)42Germination benefits greatly from cold conditioning/stratification, possibly ~ 6 weeks at 5 Celcius or colder, though typically seed is sown on moist sterilized potting soil (in plugtrays - 72 cell trays are popular) during the winter and placed outside for two months or more, preferably with snow cover. Seeds can be covered lightly or pressed into the soil surface, but should not be buried too deeply or allowed to dry out completely. In Canada, sprouts appear in late April or early May, after daytime temperatures increase, and can withstand significant frosts. Alternatively, strategies which utilize or mimic ethylene gas may also promote germination. Young seedlings grow slowly, and do better in a location semi-sheltered from sun and wind. They grow slowly, suffering both when the soil remains saturated with moisture for extended periods and when the soil becomes very dry. Thus a balance between overwatering and drought conditions should be maintained. Mild fertilization may be beneficial, but is not required. After a month or two, when a stalk is sent up from the rosette of seed leaves, seedlings can be exposed to more sun to maximize growth. Seedlings can be transplanted in their first year, but can also be kept in plugtrays for a year or two to minimize weeding in the field. Excellent transplant survival rates can be achieved any time the ground is not frozen, even with dormant (leafless) plugs in the fall. Eventually plant growth will suffer if seedlings are not planted out. -- GORDON STEINRATHS127Ideal growing site components include full or almost full sun, good drainage during the spring runoff and some shelter from the wind. While the latter is not imperitive, it will help conserve soil moisture and enhance growth. R. rosea is very drought tolerant and does not require irrigation, however, it will benefit from regular watering - natural or otherwise. Field spacing depends on the chosen weed control system, especially if plastic mulch is used. One foot in-row spacing, with eight-inch between-row spacing of plants is an average for current trials, giving three to four rows of plants per (mulched) bed. Path spacing between beds will vary with the weeding regime, or a solid (pathless) planting may be prefered.sun or partial shademoist100 eachPerennial, fleshy succulent. Rhodiola rosea is quite variable depending on origin. This seed originated from Norway.The photo is characteristic of its form. The dried roots are rose-scented, loaded with immune stimulating glycosides (e.g. rosavin, rosin). Uplifting adaptogenic properties similar to Eleuthero Ginseng. These plants are not very heat tolerant and will do best at elevation and in the north.

Time to harvest can be as short as three growing seasons, when roots can attain 0.75% rosavin content or better, though four to five year's growth will provide greater root biomass and a rosavin content of 1% or more. The roots tend to deteriorate from within as they age, harboring patches of necrotic tissue (or "heartrot") to which they will eventually succumb. The upshot is that - while there may be 75-year old plants in the wild - the maximum age of a commercial field may only be six or seven years. The dynamics of root attrition due to disease are not yet understood, and may differ with various cultivars and soil conditions. Initial indications are that fertilization is not benificial under normal conditions.

R. rosea is an adaptable species, and as such appears to do well in a variety of soil types, from rocky gravel through heavy clay to silty, sandy and peaty loam soil types. The relationship between soil pH and rosavin levels is presently poorly understood, but may favor acidity - ? As a circumpolar species, Rhodiola does well at high latitudes, where its production of rosavins assists survival under harsh conditions. How it performs in warmer climates will be an interesting experiment.
Adaptogen, Antidepressant, Immunostimulant
76Vervain, BlueVerbenaceaeVerbena hastata (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-27 00:00:00other14Sow in the early spring or give 2 weeks cold conditioning by putting seeds in moist medium in a plastic bag in the fridge (not freezer) and then sow in warm soil. Germ in 2 to 4 weeks. Space plants 6 inches apart.

Seed: sow early spring in a greenhouse or cold frame and only just cover the seed. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer.

Division in spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring.

Basal cuttings in early summer. Harvest the shoots with plenty of underground stem when they are about 8 - 10cm above the ground. Pot them up into individual pots and keep them in light shade in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer.

Succeeds in any moderately fertile well-drained but moisture retentive soil in a sunny position. Plants are hardy to about -20°c.

Plants prefer full sun to part shade and moist garden soils. Good drainage is not a necessary prerequisite. If there is a concern that the plant will spread, then keep it in a pot, or provide other suitable barriers.sun or partial shademoist200 eachUpright, creeping, self-seeding herbaceous perennial significant in medicine and ritual. Native to the Eastern US. Bright blue flowers on reddish-tinted plants, in multiple, long-lasting, handsome spikes.

Fresh or dried leaf, in tincture or tea, is a bitter remedy for treating indigestion, colds, and fevers. A good ingredient for home brew, it is also a traditional offering plant to honor the garden spirits. The plant will placate ills, real or imagined. Once imagined, ills become real, don't they? It's a quirk of the human condition that most of us would like to escape. Vervain helps you escape.

The leaves and roots are used medicinally; roots are more active than the leaves. The plant is used in the treatment of stomach aches, gravel, worms and scrofula. An infusion of the roots, leaves or seeds has been used in the early stages of fevers. A snuff made from the dried flowers has been used to treat nose bleeds.

Seed are edible cooked. The seed can be roasted and ground into a powder or used whole as a piñole. Pleasantly bitter, some of this bitterness can be removed by leeching the flour. The leaves are used as a tea substitute.
Antidepressant, Antiperiodic, Beverage, Diaphoretic, Emetic, Expectorant, Food, Ornamental, Tonic, Agavaceae, Aizoaceae, Alliaceae, Amaranthaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Araliaceae, Asteraceae, Boraginaceae, Brassicaceae, Campanulaceae, Caprifoliaceae, Adaptogen, Alterative, Analgesic, Anaphrodisiac, Anodyne, Anthelmintic, Antibacterial, Anticholesterolemic, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Zinc
supplies a particular nutrient (dynamic accumulator)
Antioxidants, Boron, Calcium, Carbohydrate, Chromium, Copper, Fat, Fat: Omega-3, Fibre: Non-Soluble, Fibre: Soluble, Folate, Iodine, Iron, Lycopene, Magnesium, Manganese, Niacin, Nitrogen, Retrieved from "http://ecoreality.org/wiki/Plant_used_for/Stimulant"

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