Plant used for/Nutritive

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Nutritive
A food for convalescents to help restore strength.

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Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for plants that are used as Nutritive:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
259AlfalfaFabaceaeMedicago sativa (dg fo pf wp)Pre-soak the seed for 12 hours in warm water and then sow in spring in situ. The seed can also be sown in situ in autumn. Seed can be obtained that has been inoculated with Rhizobium bacteria, enabling the plant to succeed in soils where the bacteria is not already present. Alfalfa can adapt to a wide range of climatic conditions from cold temperate to warm sub-tropical, but thrives best on a rich, friable, well-drained loamy soil with loose topsoil supplied with lime. It does not tolerate waterlogging and fails to grow on acid soils. Grows well on light soils. Alfalfa is a very deep rooting plant, bringing up nutrients from deep in the soil and making them available for other plants with shallower root systems. It is a good companion plant for growing near fruit trees and grape vines so long as it is in a reasonably sunny position, but it does not grow well with onions or other members of the Allium genus.Hardy to zone 5. In flower June to July. Seeds ripen July to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by bees, lepidoptera, self. Self-fertile.partial shadewell drainedpoor0 eachLeaves and young shoots - raw or cooked. The leaves can also be dried for later use. The seed is commonly sprouted which is added to salads, used in sandwiches etc or cooked in soups. The seed is soaked in warm water for 12 hours, then kept moist in a container in a warm place to sprout. It is ready in about 4 - 6 days. The seeds can also be ground into a powder and used as a mush, or mixed with cereal flours for making a nutritionally improved bread etc. An appetite-stimulating tea is made from the leaves.

Alfalfa leaves, either fresh or dried, have traditionally been used as a nutritive tonic to stimulate the appetite and promote weight gain. The plant has an oestrogenic action and could prove useful in treating problems related to menstruation and the menopause. The plant is grown commercially as a source of chlorophyll and carotene, both of which have proven health benefits. The leaves also contain the anti-oxidant tricin. The root is febrifuge and is also prescribed in cases of highly coloured urine. Extracts of the plant are antibacterial. Used for asthma, diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders (anti-ulcer).

Nitrogen, Protein, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin C, Vitamin KAnodyne, Antibacterial, Antiscorbutic, Aperient, Beverage, Diuretic, Dye, Emetic, Febrifuge, Food, Forage, Haemostatic, Mulch, Nutritive, Oil, Stimulant, Tonic
49Maca, Red; Maca RojoBrassicaceaeLepidium peruvianum (dg fo pf wp)6Sow the seed on the surface of the seed bed, stir it around with your fingers, then tamp in securely. Thin to 6 inch spacing, and harvest after the first year of growth. For most localities, best to direct-seed in September and harvest in May or so, but if your winters are very snowy I don't think this will probably work. In the case of snowy winters (zone 6 and under) I would plant this as a quick fall or spring crop and harvest small roots. We planted MACA for three years before we worked out a reasonable scenario and took in our first good roots, then a seed crop. Also, anything of this nature depends on the weather patterns of the year in question. As always, we encourage experimentation and the feedback we're getting is encouraging -- positive reports have been received from New Jersey, Santa Cruz and North Dakota. As my teacher always said, "Keep trying."The plant is very tolerant of high intensity sunlight and withstands drastic temperature fluctuations. Plant prefers fall, winter and spring conditions for growth. Full sun and a fast-draining soil is preferred. Maca likes a somewhat alkaline soil, such as decomposed granite or volcanic soils. However, lacking this kind of soil, regular garden soil will do. Composted manures are a good fertilizer for MACA. I don't think the plant will overwinter in less than zone 6, unless perhaps in very dry sites or protected alpine locations. Here in Williams we get very little snow, and the plant grows through the winter, which is preferred, as it gives the plants time to mature, and encourages bulbing (the hypocotyl). If left in the field for 2 years, the root will become quite woody and the plant will go to seed. Probably the best regions for growing maca are high steppes in tropical or subtropical countries, although it is worthwhile to try planting almost anywhere because very little is known about the potential adaptability. All plantings will be experimental until reasonable methodology and timing are worked out.full sunwell drainedgarden100 eachBiennial, radish-like, rosette forming plant native to the high Peruvian Puna. This is a high elevation cultivar that is considered to be medicinally superior to other strains.

The first photo is of a seedling that was direct-seeded outdoors. The new seed is extremely viable and vigorous, giving over 90% germination in 6 days.

Second photo shows the red-purple coloration of the root, which is still at the stage prior to formation of bulbous hypocotyl.
Calcium, Carbohydrate, Iodine, Iron, ProteinAdaptogen, Aphrodisiac, Cancer, Food, Infertility, Nutritive, Tonic

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are in a particular family
Agavaceae, Aizoaceae, Alliaceae, Amaranthaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Araliaceae, Asteraceae, Boraginaceae, Brassicaceae, Campanulaceae, Caprifoliaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Crassulaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Elaeagnaceae, Ephedraceae, Ericaceae, Fabaceae, Fagaceae, Hamamelidaceae, Hyacinthaceae, Hypericaceae, Lamiaceae, Lythraceae, Malvaceae, Myricaceae, Onagraceae, Papaveraceae, Poaceae, Polygonaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, Rubiaceae, Saururaceae, Schisandraceae, Scrophulariaceae, Solanaceae, Tropaeolaceae, Valerianaceae, Verbenaceae, Vitaceae
have a specific use
Adaptogen, Alterative, Analgesic, Anaphrodisiac, Anodyne, Anthelmintic, Antibacterial, Anticholesterolemic, Antidepressant, Antidermatosic, Antiecchymotic, Antiemetic, Antifungal, Antiinflammatory, Antiperiodic, Antiphlogistic, Antipruritic, Antipyretic, Antirheumatic, Antiscorbutic, Antiscrophulatic, Antiseptic, Antispasmodic, Antitumor, Antitussive, Aperient, Aphrodisiac, Appetizer, Aromatherapy, Astringent, Basketry, Beads, Beverage, Bitter, Bronchiodilator, Cancer, Cardiac, Cardiotonic, Carminative, Cathartic, Charcoal, Cholagogue, Compost, Cosmetic, Curdling agent, Demulcent, Deobstruent, Depurative, Detergent, Diaphoretic, Digestive, Diuretic, Dye, Emetic, Emmenagogue, Emollient, Essential, Expectorant, Febrifuge, Fibre, Flavouring, Food, Forage, Fragrance, Fuel, Fungicide, Galactogogue, Green manure, Haemostatic, Hedge, Hepatic, Homeopathy, Hypnotic, Hypoglycaemic, Hypotensive, Immunostimulant, Infertility, Insect Repellant, Insectiary, Insecticide, Kidney, Latex, Laxative, Lithontripic, Litmus, Mordant, Mouthwash, Mulch, Narcotic, Nervine, Nutritive, Oil, Oneirogen, Ophthalmic, Ornamental, Parasiticide, Pectoral, Pioneer, Pipes, Pollution, Poultice, Purgative, Refrigerant, Restorative, Rubefacient, Sacrificial, Salve, Seasoning, Sedative, Shelterbelt, Sialagogue, Skin, Soil stabilization, Sternutatory, Stimulant, Stings, Stomachic, Strewing, Stuffing, Sweetening, Tannin, TB, Tonic, Uterine tonic, Vasodilator, Vermifuge, Veterinary, Vulnerary, Warts, Waterproofing, Wood
are sensitive to a particular nutrient
Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Zinc
supplies a particular nutrient (dynamic accumulator)
Antioxidants, Boron, Calcium, Carbohydrate, Chromium, Copper, Fat, Fat: Omega-3, Fibre: Non-Soluble, Folate, Iodine, Iron, Lycopene, Magnesium, Manganese, Niacin, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Potassium, Protein, Silica, Sulfur, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Zinc

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