Plant used for/Hypotensive

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Please add more about plants that are used for Hypotensive here!

Hypotensive
Reduces blood pressure, it is used in the treatment of high blood pressure.

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Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for plants that are used as Hypotensive:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
9Astragalus; Huang-qiFabaceaeAstragalus membranaceus (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-28 00:00:0080 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant21Scarify seed lightly, and use rhizobium inoculant. Direct seed in early spring. Good cold soil germinator and a poor warm soil germinator. Germ in 3 to 10 days. Thin to 6 inches apart.

Seed best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. A period of cold stratification may help stored seed to germinate. Stored seed, and perhaps also fresh seed, should be pre-soaked for 24 hours in hot water before sowing - but make sure that you do not cook the seed. Any seed that does not swell should be carefully pricked with a needle, taking care not to damage the embryo, and re-soaked for a further 24 hours.

Germination can be slow and erratic but is usually within 4 - 9 weeks or more at 13°c if the seed is treated or sown fresh.

As soon as it is large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter, planting them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.
1460Plant is a sturdy survivor, and prefers full sun, average soil, and good drainage.

Requires a dry well-drained soil in a sunny position. Prefers a sandy slightly alkaline soil. Plants are hardy to at least -15°c.

Plants are intolerant of root disturbance and are best planted in their final positions whilst still small. Many members of this genus can be difficult to grow, this may be due partly to a lack of their specific bacterial associations in the soil.
full sunwell drainedsandy50 eachTaprooted herbaceous perennial native to China.

King of tonic herbs. It is an anabolic immunostimulant, that may be dried and ground up, then used for making tea, decoction, or tincture. As a fresh root, may be boiled in soup to release its life-supportive essence.

Plants flower yellow-white to 4 feet tall.

Huang Qi is commonly used in Chinese herbalism, where it is considered to be one of the 50 fundamental herbs.

The root is a sweet tonic herb that stimulates the immune system and many organs of the body, whilst lowering blood pressure and blood sugar levels. It is particularly suited to young, physically active people, increasing stamina and endurance and improving resistance to the cold - indeed for younger people it is perhaps superior to ginseng in this respect.

Huang Qi is used especially for treatment of the kidneys and also to avoid senility. The plant is often used in conjunction with other herbs such as Atractylodes macrocephala and Ledebouriella seseloides.

The root contains a number of bio-active constituents including saponins and isoflavonoids.

It is used in the treatment of cancer, prolapse of the uterus or anus, abscesses and chronic ulcers, chronic nephritis with oedema and proteinuria. Recent research in the West has shown that the root can increase the production of interferon and macrophages and thus help restore normal immune function in cancer patients. Patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy recover faster and live longer if given Huang Qi concurrently.

The root of 4 year old plants is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use.
NitrogenAdaptogen, Antibacterial, Cancer, Cardiotonic, Diuretic, Febrifuge, Hypoglycaemic, Hypotensive, Immunostimulant, Pectoral, Tonic, Uterine tonic, Vasodilator
34Gotu Kola; BrahmiApiaceaeHydrocotyl asiatica (dg fo pf wp)30Gotu kola is actually somewhat difficult to start from seed. Remember, it is a pioneer successional plant, with seeds that may remain dormant in the soil for decades until the right conditions occur for germination. Use a very well-draining mix (I've had zero germination in pots containing regular potting soil, except for one seed that was pinched between two pots and sprouted there -- clearly a situation of "excellent drainage." So, the best approach is to plant in greenhouse conditions in very excellently drained soil, just pressed into the surface of the soil, in which case the seeds will probably germinate in 30 to 90 days. Seed sown in the unheated greenhouse in the fall may give substantially better germination rates, but the germination time is likely to be up to 6 months. Division is simple at any time in the growing season, though the spring is probably best. We find that it is best to pot up the divisions until they are rooting away well, though in selected mild gardens it should be possible to plant the divisions out directly into their permanent positions.Old stone walls and rocky sunny places in lowland hills and especially by the coast in central and southern Japan. Shady, damp and wet places such as paddy fields, and in grass thickets.sun or partial shademoistpoor50 eachGotu kola is an outstandingly important medicinal herb. Its Indian name is 'Brahmi' which means 'bringing knowledge of the Supreme Reality' and it has long been used there medicinally and as an aid to meditation.

It is a useful tonic and cleansing herb for skin problems and digestive disorders. In India it is chiefly valued as a revitalizing herb that strengthens nervous function and memory.

The whole plant is alterative, cardio-depressant, hypotensive, weakly sedative and tonic. It is a rejuvenating diuretic herb that clears toxins, reduces inflammations and fevers, improves healing and immunity, improves the memory and has a balancing effect on the nervous system.

It has been suggested that regular use of the herb can rejuvenate the nervous system and it therefore deserves attention as a possible cure for a wide range of nervous disorders including multiple sclerosis. Recent research has shown that gotu kola reduces scarring, improves circulatory problems in the lower limbs and speeds the healing process.

It is used internally in the treatment of wounds, chronic skin conditions (including leprosy), venereal diseases, malaria, varicose veins, ulcers, nervous disorders and senility.

Externally, the herb is applied to wounds, haemorrhoids and rheumatic joints.

The plant can be harvested at any time of the year, fresh or dried. Some report the dried herb quickly loses its medicinal properties and so is best used fresh.
Adaptogen, Antiinflammatory, Cardiac, Depurative, Diuretic, Febrifuge, Hypotensive, Nervine, Sedative, Skin, Tonic
36Heimia; Sinkuiche; Sun Opener; Sinicuichi; Shrubby Yellowcrest; Elixir of the SunLythraceaeHeimia salicifolia (dg fo pf wp)Very small seed -- press into surface of potting soil and keep moist until germination. Keep seedlings in a gallon pot for a year before transplanting outdoors, or maintain the plant in a large pot, as it does reasonalble well in potted culture.Does well in pots. The plant prefers a warm exposure -- full sun, fast-draining soils. I'd guess they are hardy to 20 degrees F. Heimia is really a woody bush, and the yellow flowers are very nice. The bush can be trimmed like a hedge, and it doeesn't mind this treatment a bit.full sunwell drained500 eachWoody or herbaceous perennial bee plant bearing large yellow flowers. This plant is a source of the alkaloidal molecule known as crogenine, which is partially responsible for the hypotensive and sedative effects. Traditionally, the wilted leaves are made into a sun tea, allowed to brew and ferment for at least 24 hours before straining and drinking. The tea encourages a sense of well-being, tinting the vision with amber light, assisting with recollection of past events while promoting calmness and a sense of unity with all nature.Adaptogen, Hypotensive, Insectiary, Sedative
8Skullcap, Baical; Huang-qinLamiaceaeScutellaria baicalensis (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-27 00:00:0080 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant24Easy cultivation. Sow seed in early spring. Germ. in ~24 days. Prefers well-drained soil in the full sun. Cold hardy. Space plants 12 inches apart. To 12 inches tall. As the plants age they become wider, much like humans in middle age, but unlike humans, the seed they produce becomes increasingly viable the older they get.127The herb is more effective if grown in poor, sandy soil. Relatively easy to start from seed in the spring, the plants prefer a full sun position and deep, dry, well-drained soils. The flowers appear for the first time in the fall of the first year, and after that the plant flowers copiously every summer, producing heady blue or purple blooms for as long as three months before the blossoms give way to the characteristically hooded seed capsules.full sunwell drainedpoor50 eachHerbaceous perennial. Native to the shores of Lake Baikal, Mongolia, Siberia, and the Chihli and Shantung provinces of China. The purple flowers are like schools of dolphin breaking through green waves in a summer sea.

The part used in traditional Chinese medicine is the dried root, which has a bitter and cold energetic. Contains distinctive flavones, specifically baicalin and wogonin, which have antiallergic, diuretic, hypotensive, antibacterial, antiviral, tranquilizing and fever-reducing effects. In practical terms, it is one of the best agents for cooling an infection, and I recommend it especially for people who are travelling and may contract dysentery -- it cures the shits.

This is one of the best Chinese plants to grow organically in America. Not only is it a very striking bedding plant, bearing one of the nicest flowers available from this catalog, but there is on-going demand for the root, which attains harvestable size after only 2 years.

Note: Actually, I'm pretty excited about Baical Skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis) for treatment of pandemic diseases such as avian flu. My experience is that the root of this plant, which has been used in Chinese medicine for a very long time as the herb Huang-qin, is extremely effective for treating contagious flu-like maladies. There is really no better anti-infection agent in herbalism, to my knowledge.

Added advantages of Huang-qin are

1) lack of side-effects,

2) quick to germinate and easily grown throughout the temperate US

4) pretty

5) and can be harvested in the fall of first or (better) second year 6) no side effects.

Here's a picture of the freshly harvested root -- extremely potent as you can probably tell.

Germination Note: I tested commercial seed I got from China against our organic seed and the chinese seed gave 30% germ and the organic seed gave 95% germ. The organic seed came up in 10 days and the commercial seed came up in 12 days. The organic seed was more vigorous than the commercial seed.

Text from a small article written by Richo that appeared in the AHA Quarterly: The Chinese herb Baical Skullcap, known in Chinese as Huang-qin (Scutellaria baicalensis) has a history of medicinal usage dating back over 2,000 years. The bright yellow roots of this pretty perennial herb are used traditionally to abate diarrhea and dysentery and to enhance liver function in the treatment of hepatitis. They are also an active antibacterial treatment for Staph (Staphylococcus aureus) infection, which is a major cause of secondary infections in hospitals in the US.

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, practitioners use Huang-qin as frequently as Westerners use Goldenseal. Many Westerners have yet to appreciate Huang-qin to the extent that it deserves. An added bonus is that the herb is well suited to cultivation in the western states, thriving in gardens all the way from Washington down to Southern California.

Baical skullcap is a low-lying bedding plant, excellent for high-use areas such as next to pathways. After the third year of growth, the roots may be dug and dried for medicinal use. No fancy processing is necessary. The roots can be sliced into sections while fresh and dried in the shade, then made into tincture or tea. Good quality roots are bright yellow, not green or black. Any herb that looks that good in the garden and treats the formidable adversaries hepatitis and staph deserves plenty of attention!
Antiinflammatory, Diuretic, Febrifuge, Hypotensive, Ornamental, Sedative

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Adaptogen, Alterative, Analgesic, Anaphrodisiac, Anodyne, Anthelmintic, Antibacterial, Anticholesterolemic, Antidepressant, Antidermatosic, Antidote, Antiecchymotic, Antiemetic, Antifungal, Antiinflammatory, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, Antiperiodic, Antiphlogistic, Antipruritic, Antipyretic, Antirheumatic, Antiscorbutic, Antiscrophulatic, Antiseptic, Antispasmodic, Antitumor, Antitussive, Antiviral, Anxiolytic, Aperient, Aphrodisiac, Appetizer, Aromatherapy, Astringent, Basketry, Beads, Beverage, Bitter, Bronchiodilator, Cancer, Cardiac, Cardiotonic, Carminative, Cathartic, Charcoal, Cholagogue, Compost, Contraceptive, Cosmetic, Curdling agent, Demulcent, Deobstruent, Depurative, Detergent, Diaphoretic, Digestive, Diuretic, Dye, Emetic, Emmenagogue, Emollient, Essential, Expectorant, Febrifuge, Fibre, Flavouring, Food, Forage, Fragrance, Fuel, Fungicide, Galactogogue, Green manure, Haemostatic, Hedge, Hepatic, Homeopathy, Hypnotic, Hypoglycaemic, Hypotensive, Immunomodulator, Immunostimulant, Infertility, Insect Repellant, Insectiary, Insecticide, Kidney, Latex, Laxative, Lithontripic, Litmus, Mordant, Mouthwash, Mulch, Narcotic, Nervine, Nutritive, Oil, Oneirogen, Ophthalmic, Ornamental, Parasiticide, Pectoral, Pioneer, Pipes, Pollution, Poultice, Purgative, Refrigerant, Restorative, Rubefacient, Sacrificial, Salve, Seasoning, Sedative, Shelterbelt, Sialagogue, Skin, Soil stabilization, Sternutatory, Stimulant, Stings, Stomachic, Strewing, Stuffing, Sweetening, Tannin, TB, Tonic, Uterine tonic, Vasodilator, Vermifuge, Veterinary, Vulnerary, Warts, Waterproofing, Wood
are sensitive to a particular nutrient
Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Zinc
supplies a particular nutrient (dynamic accumulator)
Antioxidants, Boron, Calcium, Carbohydrate, Chromium, Copper, Fat, Fat: Omega-3, Fibre: Non-Soluble, Folate, Iodine, Iron, Lycopene, Magnesium, Manganese, Niacin, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Potassium, Protein, Silica, Sulfur, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Zinc

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