Plant used for/Carminative

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Carminative
Reduces flatulence and expels gas from the intestines.

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Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for plants that are used as Carminative:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
13Angelica Tree, JapaneseAraliaceaeAralia elata (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-22 00:00:00240 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant30Soak berries overnight, then smash them (it's easy) and float off the fruit and plant the seeds. Sow seeds in the fall to early spring. Slow and spotty germ is normal, so do not prematurely discard flats.

Seed best sown as soon as ripe in a cold frame. Stored seed requires 3 - 5 months of cold stratification. Germination usually takes place within 1 - 4 months at 20°c. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse for at least their first winter. Once the plants are 25cm or more tall, they can be planted out into their permanent positions, late spring or early summer being the best time to do this.

Root cuttings 8cm long, December in a cold frame. Store the roots upside down in sand and pot up in March/April. High percentage.

Division of suckers in late winter. Very easy, the suckers can be planted out direct into their permanent positions if required.

Prefers a good deep loam and a position in semi-shade but it also succeeds in a sunny position. Requires a sheltered position. Plants are hardier when grown on poorer soils. Prefers an acid soil. Dormant plants are hardy to at least -15°c. The young growth in spring, even on mature plants, is frost-tender and so it is best to grow the plants in a position sheltered from the early morning sun.

A very ornamental species, there are a number of named varieties. It is usually a single stemmed shrub, spreading by means of suckers. This species is closely allied to A. chinensis.
Plant prefers full sun to part shade and moist soils.sun or partial shademoistpoor100 eachHardiness: All temperate zones.

Deciduous perennial shrub to small tree native to China. Highly ornamental, with narrow compound leaves and masses of fragrant, white flowers. Leaves turn bright red in the fall.

Widely used in native medicine, the plant is known to treat everything from coughs to cancer.
Anodyne, Antitussive, Cancer, Carminative, Food, Ornamental
237Basil, Holy, TulsiLamiaceaeOcimum sanctum (dg fo pf wp)2013-03-15 00:00:00400 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant250 eachAdaptogen, Antidermatosic, Antifungal, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, Antipyretic, Antitussive, Antiviral, Anxiolytic, Cardiac, Carminative, Diuretic, Expectorant, Febrifuge, Immunomodulator, Lithontripic, Mouthwash, Ophthalmic, Pectoral, Seasoning, Stings
18Bergamot, Red; Bee Balm; Oswego TeaLamiaceaeMonarda didyma (dg fo pf wp)0 eachRare. The red-flowered Bergamot, highly aromatic and decorative, is surely one of the most striking of Native American wild plants, with a long history of use in medicine. The tea or tincture of the plant is delightfully tasty, a general carminative and digestive, also useful for treating the common cold and crabiness.Carminative, Digestive, Fragrance
248Butterfly Weed; Pleurisy RootApocynaceaeAsclepias tuberosa (dg fo pf wp)30Seed best sown in a greenhouse as soon as it is ripe in the autumn or in late winter. We have also had good results from sowing the seed in the greenhouse in early spring, though stored seed might need 2 - 3 weeks cold stratification. Germination usually takes place in 1 - 3 months at 18°c. As soon as the seedlings are large enough to handle, prick them out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out when they are in active growth in late spring or early summer and give them some protection from slugs until they are growing away strongly.

Division in spring. With great care since the plant resents root disturbance. Pot the divisions up and place them in a lightly shaded position in the greenhouse until they are growing away strongly, then plant them out in the summer, giving them some protection from slugs until they are established.

Basal cuttings in late spring. Use shoots about 10cm long with as much of their white underground stem as possible. Pot them up individually and place them in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse until they are rooting and growing actively. If the plants grow sufficiently, they can be put into their permanent positions in the summer, otherwise keep them in the greenhouse until the following spring and when they are in active growth plant them out into their permanent positions. Give them some protection from slugs until they are established.

Prefers a well-drained light, rich or peaty soil. Prefers a sandy soil and a sunny position. Prefers a slightly acid soil. Prefers a dry soil. Plants are hardy to about -20°c.

Plants should be pot-grown from seed and planted out in their permanent positions when young. Plants are particularly at risk from slugs, however, and some protection will probably be required until the plants are established and also in the spring when the new shoots come into growth. The flower can trap insects between its anther cells, the struggles of the insect in escaping ensure the pollination of the plant.
sun or partial shadewell drainedrich0 each*Flower buds - cooked. They taste somewhat like peas.
  • Young shoots - cooked. An asparagus substitute.
  • The tips of older shoots are cooked like spinach.
  • Young seed pods - cooked. Harvested when 3 - 4 cm long and before the seed floss begins to form, they are very appetizing.
  • The flower clusters can be boiled down to make a sugary syrup. In hot weather the flowers produce so much nectar that it crystallises out into small lumps which can be eaten like sweets, they are delicious.
  • Root - cooked. A nutty flavour. Some reports say that it is poisonous.
  • An edible oil is obtained from the seed. The seed is very small, however, and commercial usage would not be very viable.

Pleurisy root is a bitter, nutty-flavoured tonic herb that increases perspiration, relieves spasms and acts as an expectorant. It was much used by the North American Indians and acquired a reputation as a heal-all amongst the earlier white settlers. Its main use in present day herbalism is for relieving the pain and inflammation of pleurisy. The root was very popular as a medicinal herb for the treatment of a range of lung diseases, it was considered especially useful as an expectorant.

It has also been used internally with great advantage in the treatment of diarrhoea, dysentery, rheumatism etc. Use with caution; this remedy should not be prescribed for pregnant women.

The root is harvested in the autumn and can be used fresh or dried. A poultice of the dried, powdered roots is used in the treatment of swellings, bruises, wounds, ulcers, lameness etc.
Antispasmodic, Carminative, Cathartic, Diaphoretic, Diuretic, Expectorant, Insectiary, Latex, Oil, Ornamental, Pollution, Poultice, Stuffing, Sweetening, Tonic, Vasodilator
22ChervilApiaceaeAnthriscus cerefolium (dg fo pf wp)Direct seed in the spring garden. Cutting back regularly and sowing in succession will keep chervil herb coming to the tabvle throughout the season. Very fast to make edible leaf.Prefers a cool, moist location where it will put on a great deal of green herb without bolting.100 eachHardiness: The plant will perform well in any garden in the summertime and is a good winter crop in maritime gardens or in the winter greenhouse, even if the greenhouse is unheated.

Hardy annual native to Europe, growing to about 12 inches and with a mounding habit. Chervil has a reputation of repelling slugs. The plants are petite and the flavor is very fine. It is a gourmet parsley-like plant that is used in seasoning vegetables, meat dishes, omelettes, soups, and for making salad dressing.

This is a culinary herb that is also used as a diuretic and blood-purifier and carminative (digestive agent).

The herb is experiencing a renaissance of popularity, and is very saleable in salad mixes or as a plant in a pot.
Carminative, Diuretic, Insect Repellant, Seasoning
23Cilantro; Coriander; Thai ParsleyApiaceaeCoriandrum sativum (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-07 00:00:00520 each seeds in 8cc blocksplantSow directly in the garden bed. Germination can be a bit cranky, so be patient. Sow starting in the early spring, in successions 3 weeks apart, in order to assure ongoing availability of the fresh herb.30Plant prefers full sun and regular garden soil.full sungarden200 eachAnnual. 30 days to cilantro, 60 days to coriander.

Harvest the shining, smooth leaves before the plant flowers for use as the culinary spice Cilantro in cooking and in salsa. Harvest the seeds and use them as Coriander, a curry ingredient and also a respected medicinal herb.

Medicinally, the fresh or dried herb and seeds chelate heavy metals and help move them out of the body—this includes mercury and lead. The seeds are especially stimulant, aromatic and carminative. Combine fresh green coriander seeds with spilanthes buds and extract together in alcohol for a mouthwash experience that surpasses everything with the possible exception of a crisp ripe apple right off the tree. Interestingly, we invented this combination spontaneously and only later found out that coriander helps the body chelate mercury that might be seeping from old fillings.

RECIPE FOR CHELATION SALSA Here’s our recipe for “Chelation Salsa” 2 cups chopped fresh cilantro 2 cups chopped fresh tomato 1 cup chopped fresh basil ½ cup chopped pumpkin seeds 4 cloves garlic, chopped and pressed Hot peppers to taste 1 TBS lemon juice 2 TBS olive oil

Salt to taste
Carminative, Seasoning, Stimulant
28Epazote; WormseedChenopodiaceaeChenopodium ambrosioides (dg fo pf wp)Strew seed on surface of sandy soil and keep moist until germination.Plant prefers full sun and does well in waste ground.full sun100 eachPerennial wormwood-like plant is the source of a potent spice and vermifuge. The dried leaf is traditionally mixed in bean dishes, a tasty practice that also allays flatus. In sufficient dosage, and especially if the seeds are taken by themselves, the plant will aid in expulsion of intestinal worms.Calcium, Manganese, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, PotassiumCarminative, Seasoning
46Ku-shenFabaceaeSophora flavescens (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-28 00:00:0044 each seeds in 8cc blocksplantScarify and soak seed overnight and sow fall to early spring. Work up seedlings in pots until they are big enough to withstand the rigors of planting outdoors.

Seed best sown as soon as it is ripe in a greenhouse. Pre-soak stored seed for 12 hours in hot (not boiling) water and sow in late winter in a greenhouse. Prick out the seedlings as soon as they are large enough to handle into individual pots in the greenhouse, and grow them on for 2 years under protected conditions. Plant them out into their permanent positions in early summer of their third year.

Plants should be container-grown and planted out whilst young, older plants do not transplant well. A polymorphic species. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby.

CUTTINGS of young shoots with a heel, July/August in a frame. Also, air-layering.
The plant itself does well in the same habitat as Sea Buckthorn (Hippophaea rhamnoides), with an ability to improve poor soil and stabilize loose, sloping ground. Relatively cold-hardy broadleaf evergreens brighten the dreary drears of winter. Plant prefers full sun and is not picky about soil.

Succeeds in a well-drained moderately fertile soil in full sun. Requires the protection of a sunny wall if it is to flower, and succeeds only in the mildest areas of the country. It grows best in the warmer areas of the country where the wood will be more readily ripened and better able to withstand winter cold.

Although hardy to at least -15°c, this species does not do very well in the relatively cool summers of Britain, the plant gradually weakens and eventually succumbs. It can be grown in the milder areas of the country and be treated like a herbaceous perennial, growing afresh from the base each spring.
full sunwell drainedpoor50 eachEvergreen perennial shrub to 5 feet, native to China and Japan. The dried root of this handsome, nitrogen-fixing subshrub is one of the Chinese herbs that clears heat, having a bitter and cold nature, used for jaundice, diarrhea, vaginal discharge and sores. It is a relatively important herb in the Chinese materia medica.NitrogenAnthelmintic, Antibacterial, Antifungal, Antipruritic, Astringent, Bitter, Carminative, Diuretic, Febrifuge, Insect Repellant, Parasiticide, Pectoral, Stomachic, Tonic
56PennyroyalLamiaceaeMentha pulegium (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-07 00:00:00520 each seeds in 8cc blocksplantDIVISION: Preferred propagation, as menthas cross readily and seed will not breed true reliably. Also, even in true M. pulegium, medicinal value differs widely between plants. Find the ones you like, and divide them to propagate clones. Divide any time of year. SEED: Sow spring in cold frame. Sow on surface in spring. Space plants 6 inches apart.Plant prefers moist garden soil, areas that puddle up and then go dry, the edge of a stream or ditch, or the margin of a pond. Grow in containers if the spreading habit of this plant makes you uncomfortable, but the rest of us let it go where it will, as it is self-limiting when it meets -- dry soil.sun or partial shadeseasonal floodingpoor100 eachHerbaceous or in warmer zones evergreen perennial native to Europe. One of the smallest of the mints, it creeps around in moist places and sends up its pretty flowering tops to a height of only about a foot, in the summer. Pennyroyal makes a bright tea that is well appreciated by many, but it should never be used during pregnancy.Antiseptic, Antispasmodic, Carminative, Detergent, Diaphoretic, Emmenagogue, Fragrance, Insect Repellant, Insectiary, Sedative, Stimulant, Strewing, Uterine tonic
57Pepper, African Bird; Pilipili Hoho; Pilipili Kichaa; African Bird Peppers; Birdseye Pepper; Pequin; Piquin; PenguinSolanaceaeCapsicum frutescens (dg fo pf wp)8Start indoors 40 to 50 days prior to the last frost. Thin seedlings to at least 2 inches apart in the flat. Transplant out to garden after the soil has really warmed up. We grow ours in a cloche even in the summer, as cold nights can set them back. The best compost for peppers is higher in phosphorous than nitrogen. Kelp is well-tolerated and makes for outrageous yields.170Peppers prefer a scanty, even water supply, good drainage, full sun, and a long, hot summer. Excellent choice for greenhouse pepper growers or folks growing peppers in the South or Gulf States, as well as in the tropics.full sunwell drained180,000 Scoville Heat Units. Perennial bush pepper. 170 days to maturity, best yields in the second year. These are grown by us on our farm here in Southern Oregon, the culmination of a long learning in the subject of African peppers. The plant itself is comely, 4 feet tall and with a flat top, leaves light green. Peppers are tiny, fiery hot, thin-skinned and easily dried, green at first, turning bright red at maturity (see pictures).

One of the primary reasons for my last trip to Zanzibar was to find a reputable and viable source of "bird peppers." These peppers find their way into local cuisine, to flavor samosas and curries, and they are used worldwide for making sauces, vinegars and medicinal compounds. The flavor is citrusy, smoky, and nutty (if you can get past the incredible hotness of them). Clearly, one way to get past the hotness and appreciate these peppers is to use them sparingly in cuisine -- a little goes a long way!

Medicinally, bird peppers are potently anticarcinogenic, warming, carminative, digestive, and stimulating. Tiny, fiery hot, thin-skinned and easily dried.
Carminative, Ornamental, Seasoning, Stimulant
322SpearmintLamiaceaeMentha spicata (dg fo pf wp)2013-06-24 00:00:0056 each starts in greenhouse soiltransplantSeed - sow spring in a cold frame. Germination is usually fairly quick. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer. Mentha species are very prone to hybridisation and so the seed cannot be relied on to breed true. Even without hybridisation, seedlings will not be uniform and so the content of medicinal oils etc will vary. When growing plants with a particular aroma it is best to propagate them by division[K]. Division can be easily carried out at almost any time of the year, though it is probably best done in the spring or autumn to allow the plant to establish more quickly. Virtually any part of the root is capable of growing into a new plant. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. However, for maximum increase it is possible to divide the roots up into sections no more than 3cm long and pot these up in light shade in a cold frame. They will quickly become established and can be planted out in the summer. Woodland garden sunny edge; dappled shade; shady edge; cultivated bedspartial shademoistclayAntiemetic, Antiseptic, Cancer, Carminative, Diuretic, Essential, Insect Repellant, Poultice, Restorative, Stimulant, Stomachic, Strewing
75ValerianValerianaceaeValeriana officinalis (dg fo pf wp)10Seed is short-lived and should be sown within a year of receipt. Light dependent germinator. Sow in spring, tamped securely into surface, and keep evenly moist until germination, which occurs in 10 to 16 days. Seedling leaves look very un-valerian at first and some folks are confused. But have faith, in time the leaves will become divided and much more closely resemble the standard form of the plant. Space plants 1 to 2 feet apart.

Seed: sow spring in a cold frame and only just cover the seed because it requires light for germination. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant out into their permanent positions in the summer if sufficient growth has been made. If the plants are too small to plant out, grow them on in the greenhouse or frame for their first winter and plant them out early in the following summer.

Division: in spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring.


A very easily grown plant, it succeeds in ordinary garden soil, preferring a rich heavy loam in a moist site. Thrives in full sun or in partial shade, doing well in light woodland.

A polymorphic species, the more extreme variations are given specific status by some botanists. Valerian is often grown in the herb garden and also sometimes grown commercially as a medicinal herb.

When grown for its medicinal root, the plant should not be allowed to flower. The flowers and the dried roots have a strong smell somewhat resembling stale perspiration. Cats are very fond of this plant, particularly the powdered root. Once a cat has discovered a plant they will often destroy it by constantly rolling over it.

The dried root also attracts rats and can be used as a bait in traps. A good companion for most plants.
730Valerian prefers full sun to part shade and moist but well-drained soils. I have seen excellent clumps form, during a wet spring, on the peak of a pile of ground pumice. However, regular garden soil amended with organic compost will do nicely. The plant adapts rather well to a wide range of conditions.sun or partial shademoistclay0 eachHerbaceous perennial. Native to Europe and temperate Asia.

One of the best phosphorous accumulators.

Probably the strongest herbal cerebral sedative, the plant makes one go to sleep. All parts of the plant are active, but it is the spreading root and root crown, dug and used fresh, that is most commonly used, and the tincture of the fresh root is the most common dosage form. However, I have gone to sleep after eating a salad that an unwitting apprentice had prepared using valerian leaves as an ingredient, and I've had multiple correspondences from folks that make tinctures out of the fresh flowers. Regardless of how you make the potion, it is well-known that Valerian does not work on everybody. Some folks are stimulated by it. However, most of us go to sleep under her influence.

Flowers white in the second year to a height of 5 feet or more. Some companies are slinging varieties of Valerian that they claim are medicinally superior to the standard European strain (which is what we grow). However, the standard strain is plenty good enough to do the job.

Valerian is a well-known and frequently used medicinal herb that has a long and proven history of efficacy. It is noted especially for its effect as a tranquilliser and nervine, particularly for those people suffering from nervous overstrain. Valerian has been shown to encourage sleep, improve sleep quality and reduce blood pressure. It is also used internally in the treatment of painful menstruation, cramps, hypertension, irritable bowel syndrome etc.

It should not be prescribed for patients with liver problems.

Externally, it is used to treat eczema, ulcers and minor injuries.

The active ingredients are called valepotriates, research has confirmed that these have a calming effect on agitated people, but are also a stimulant in cases of fatigue.

The roots of 2 year old plants are harvested in the autumn once the leaves have died down and are used fresh or dried. The fresh root is about 3 times as effective as roots dried at 40°, whilst temperatures above 82° destroy the active principle in the root.

Use with caution, can lead to addiction.

The plant yields about 1% of an essential oil from the roots.

Seed is edible. An essential oil from the leaves and root is used as a flavouring in ice cream, baked goods, condiments etc. It is especially important in apple flavours. The leaves can also be used as a condiment. The plant is used in moderation as a herbal tea.

It is used in perfumery to provide a 'mossy' aroma, though the scent is considered to be disagreeable by many people. The dried roots are also placed in linen cupboards and clothes drawers in order to scent the clothes.

The dried root attracts rats and cats, it can be used as a bait to lure them away from other areas.

An ingredient of 'QR' herbal compost activator. This is a dried and powdered mixture of several herbs that can be added to a compost heap in order to speed up bacterial activity and thus shorten the time needed to make the compost. The plant can also be used to make a very good liquid plant feed. It attracts earthworms. The leaves are very rich in phosphorus.
PhosphorousAntispasmodic, Beverage, Carminative, Compost, Diuretic, Essential, Flavouring, Fragrance, Hypnotic, Insectiary, Nervine, Sedative, Stimulant
80Wood Betony; WoundwortLamiaceaeStachys officinalis (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-27 00:00:00120 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant7Sow in the early spring. Standard greenhouse culture or direct seed. Barely cover seed, tamp well and keep evenly moist until germination, which occurs inb 1 to 3 weeks. Space 2 feet apart. Flowers from 2 to 3 feet tall.

Seed: sow spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots once they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer.

Division in spring. Very easy, the plant can be successfully divided at almost any time of the year. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found it best to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in a lightly shaded position in a cold frame, planting them out once they are well established in the summer.

Prefers a light moist neutral to acid soil in sun or light shade. A characteristic plant of healthy roadside banks on heavy soils. Hardy to at least -25°c. At one time bugle was often cultivated for its medicinal virtues, though it is now little used. There are some named varieties selected for their ornamental value. An excellent bee plant.
sun or partial shademoistclay100 eachHerbaceous perennial, highly adaptable to lowland sites as well as gardens at altitude. Native to Europe and Russia. This moisture-loving plant is a clumper, making a lush mound that flowers in multiple upright racemes red-purple.

The tea or tincture of fresh leaf helps relieve acute or chronic pain.

Note from Richo: A truly stellar herb. We had to really dig to come up with the seeds back in the day. One of the best fresh tincture herbs for treating addiction -- the taste is so good that it can in and of itself become addictive! But that's a good thing. Nervine tonic against stresses of living in the good ol' USA.

Wood betony was at one time commonly used as a medicinal plant in the treatment of a wide range of disorders, especially as a nervine and tonic for treating maladies of the head and as an external application to wounds. It also stimulates the digestive system and the liver, having an overall tonic effect upon the body. Wood betony is much less used nowadays, and more often forms part of a mixture of herbs.

The whole plant is collected when in flower in the summer and can be dried for later use.

It is taken in the treatment of 'frayed nerves', pre-menstrual complaints, poor memory and tension. It can be taken in combination with herbs such as comfrey, Symphytum officinale, and lime flowers, Tilia species, to treat sinus headaches and congestion. Wood betony can be taken on its own, or with yarrow, Achillea millefolium, to staunch nosebleeds. A pinch of the powdered herb will provoke violent sneezing and it has been used as part of a herbal snuff mixture in the treatment of headaches. A homeopathic remedy is made from the fresh plant. It is used in the treatment of asthma and excessive perspiration.

A fine yellow dye is obtained from the leaves.

The leaves and flowering tops make a good tea substitute. Refreshing and aromatic, it has all the good qualities of tea without the negative ones.
Analgesic, Anthelmintic, Antiseptic, Astringent, Beverage, Carminative, Cathartic, Cholagogue, Digestive, Diuretic, Dye, Emetic, Emmenagogue, Expectorant, Homeopathy, Insectiary, Nervine, Sedative, Sternutatory, Tonic, Vulnerary
282WormwoodAsteraceaeArtemisia absinthium (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-26 00:00:00100 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant180Seed: surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse. The seed usually germinates within 2 - 26 weeks at 15°c[134]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots. They can be planted out in the summer, or kept in pots in a cold frame for the winter and then planted out in the spring.

Cuttings: half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame.

Division: in spring or autumn.

Succeeds in any soil, but best in poor, dry, warm soil, which also promotes longevity and aroma.
sun or partial shadewell drainedpoor0 eachInhibits growth of fennel, sage, caraway, anise, and most young plants, especially in wet years [14, 18, 20].

Good companion to carrots, protecting them from root fly[201].

Deerproof, attracts dogs.

Fresh or dried shoots repel insects and mice. An infusion discourages slugs and insects.

Valued especially for its tonic effect on the liver, gallbladder and digestive system, and for its vermicidal activity[4, 238, 254].

Extremely useful medicine for those with weak and under-active digestion. It increases stomach acid and bile production, improving digestion and the absorption of nutrients[254]. It also eases wind and bloating and, if taken regularly, helps the body return to full vitality after a prolonged illness[254].

The leaves and flowering shoots are anthelmintic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitumor, carminative, cholagogue, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hypnotic, stimulant, stomachic, tonic and vermifuge[4, 9, 21, 46, 165, 222, 254].

Harvested as it is coming into flower and then dried for later use[4]. Use with caution[21], the plant should be taken internally in small doses for short-term treatment only, preferably under the supervision of a qualified practitioner[238]. It should not be prescribed for children or pregnant women[238].

The extremely bitter leaves are chewed to stimulate the appetite[222]. The bitter taste on the tongue sets off a reflex action, stimulating stomach and other digestive secretions[254].

Leaves have been used with some success in the treatment of anorexia nervosa[244].

Applied externally to bruises and bites[238]. A warm compress has been used to ease sprains and strained muscles[257].

A homeopathic remedy is made from the leaves[9]. It is used to stimulate bile and gastric juice production and to treat disorders of the liver and gall bladder[9].
Anthelmintic, Antiinflammatory, Antiseptic, Antispasmodic, Antitumor, Carminative, Cholagogue, Emmenagogue, Febrifuge, Flavouring, Fragrance, Homeopathy, Hypnotic, Insect Repellant, Stimulant, Stomachic, Strewing, Tonic, Vermifuge, Veterinary

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