Plant used for/Antidepressant

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Antidepressant
Helps balance brain chemistry.

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Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for plants that are used as Antidepressant:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
19Cohosh, BlackRanunculaceaeCimicifuga racemosa (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-26 00:00:00208 each seeds in 8cc blocksplantSow in fall for germination in first or second spring, or give 3 months warm followed by 3 months cold followed by warm again. If this scenario is followed, germ then occurs in warm soil in 1-2 weeks. Work seedlings up in pots in the shadehouse for a year or two before transplanting out. A long-lived plant, development is slow at first, but given adequate compost and moisture during the growing season, monumental individuals can eventually be achieved.Plant prefers edge of forest or shade garden. Black Cohosh withstands more shade than most forest-dependent plants, and if the seedlings are worked up for several years until they are quite large, then you can even plant it in the open garden with good results.full shade100 each(Recently re-classified as Actaea racemosa*)

Perennial, native to the Eastern Forest biome in the US. Hardy to all temperate zones. One of the best and most robust of herbal landscape plants. Striking foliage and tall white racemes.

The tincture of fresh root is antidepressant, pain relieving, sedative, peripheral vasodilating, antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory, specific for treating tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and is customarily used to control the infamous "hot flashes" of menopause.

  • but we are not using this nomenclature and indeed do not agree with it. Actea is the baneberry genus, and as the name implies plants within this genus should bear BERRIES. Black cohosh is correctly put in the Cimicifuga genus as, consistent with other members of Cimicifuga, it bears its seeds in a FOLLICLE (not a berry for goodness sakes!).
Analgesic, Antidepressant, Antiinflammatory, Antispasmodic, Ornamental, Sedative, Vasodilator
50Kanna; KougoedAizoaceaeScletium tortuosum (dg fo pf wp)Culture is much the same as for Cacti -- surface sow on gritty soil, keeping warm and damp and in the light until germination. Typical Cactus mix is 50% white pumice, 25% coarse, sharp sand, and 25% organic matter such as coir or compost. Many growers use gallon pots and stretch plastic over the top of the pot to create a mini-greenhouse effect. When seedlings emerge, prop them up with bits of pumice to help them stay positioned and root in. Do not dislodge when watering. Slowly acclimatize plants to full sun and drier soil.Plants prefer full sun, with moisture and fertility in summer and kept dry in winter.full sunwell drained20 eachPerennial succulent native to S. Africa, hardy to about 20 degrees F. Rare.

Source of the alkaloid mesembrine, which is a seratonin reuptake inhibitor, an herbal antidepressant if you will.

Scletium flower sporadically year-round, most heavily in late winter and early spring. They are self-seeding.
Antidepressant
62Rhodiola, Alpine; Golden Root; Rose RootCrassulaceaeRhodiola rosea (dg fo pf wp)42Germination benefits greatly from cold conditioning/stratification, possibly ~ 6 weeks at 5 Celcius or colder, though typically seed is sown on moist sterilized potting soil (in plugtrays - 72 cell trays are popular) during the winter and placed outside for two months or more, preferably with snow cover. Seeds can be covered lightly or pressed into the soil surface, but should not be buried too deeply or allowed to dry out completely. In Canada, sprouts appear in late April or early May, after daytime temperatures increase, and can withstand significant frosts. Alternatively, strategies which utilize or mimic ethylene gas may also promote germination. Young seedlings grow slowly, and do better in a location semi-sheltered from sun and wind. They grow slowly, suffering both when the soil remains saturated with moisture for extended periods and when the soil becomes very dry. Thus a balance between overwatering and drought conditions should be maintained. Mild fertilization may be beneficial, but is not required. After a month or two, when a stalk is sent up from the rosette of seed leaves, seedlings can be exposed to more sun to maximize growth. Seedlings can be transplanted in their first year, but can also be kept in plugtrays for a year or two to minimize weeding in the field. Excellent transplant survival rates can be achieved any time the ground is not frozen, even with dormant (leafless) plugs in the fall. Eventually plant growth will suffer if seedlings are not planted out. -- GORDON STEINRATHS127Ideal growing site components include full or almost full sun, good drainage during the spring runoff and some shelter from the wind. While the latter is not imperitive, it will help conserve soil moisture and enhance growth. R. rosea is very drought tolerant and does not require irrigation, however, it will benefit from regular watering - natural or otherwise. Field spacing depends on the chosen weed control system, especially if plastic mulch is used. One foot in-row spacing, with eight-inch between-row spacing of plants is an average for current trials, giving three to four rows of plants per (mulched) bed. Path spacing between beds will vary with the weeding regime, or a solid (pathless) planting may be prefered.sun or partial shademoist100 eachPerennial, fleshy succulent. Rhodiola rosea is quite variable depending on origin. This seed originated from Austria and Germany, and the photo is characteristic of its form. The dried roots are rose-scented, loaded with immune stimulating glycosides (e.g. rosavin, rosin). Uplifting adaptogenic properties similar to Eleuthero Ginseng. Rhodiola does best at elevation and in the North.

Time to harvest can be as short as three growing seasons, when roots can attain 0.75% rosavin content or better, though four to five year's growth will provide greater root biomass and a rosavin content of 1% or more. The roots tend to deteriorate from within as they age, harboring patches of necrotic tissue (or "heartrot") to which they will eventually succumb. The upshot is that - while there may be 75-year old plants in the wild - the maximum age of a commercial field may only be six or seven years. The dynamics of root attrition due to disease are not yet understood, and may differ with various cultivars and soil conditions. Initial indications are that fertilization is not benificial under normal conditions.

R. rosea is an adaptable species, and as such appears to do well in a variety of soil types, from rocky gravel through heavy clay to silty, sandy and peaty loam soil types. The relationship between soil pH and rosavin levels is presently poorly understood, but may favor acidity - ? As a circumpolar species, Rhodiola does well at high latitudes, where its production of rosavins assists survival under harsh conditions. How it performs in warmer climates will be an interesting experiment.
Adaptogen, Antidepressant, Immunostimulant
64Rhodiola, Russian; Golden Root; Rose RootCrassulaceaeRhodiola rosea (dg fo pf wp)42Germination benefits greatly from cold conditioning/stratification, possibly ~ 6 weeks at 5 Celcius or colder, though typically seed is sown on moist sterilized potting soil (in plugtrays - 72 cell trays are popular) during the winter and placed outside for two months or more, preferably with snow cover. Seeds can be covered lightly or pressed into the soil surface, but should not be buried too deeply or allowed to dry out completely. In Canada, sprouts appear in late April or early May, after daytime temperatures increase, and can withstand significant frosts. Alternatively, strategies which utilize or mimic ethylene gas may also promote germination. Young seedlings grow slowly, and do better in a location semi-sheltered from sun and wind. They grow slowly, suffering both when the soil remains saturated with moisture for extended periods and when the soil becomes very dry. Thus a balance between overwatering and drought conditions should be maintained. Mild fertilization may be beneficial, but is not required. After a month or two, when a stalk is sent up from the rosette of seed leaves, seedlings can be exposed to more sun to maximize growth. Seedlings can be transplanted in their first year, but can also be kept in plugtrays for a year or two to minimize weeding in the field. Excellent transplant survival rates can be achieved any time the ground is not frozen, even with dormant (leafless) plugs in the fall. Eventually plant growth will suffer if seedlings are not planted out. -- GORDON STEINRATHS127Ideal growing site components include full or almost full sun, good drainage during the spring runoff and some shelter from the wind. While the latter is not imperitive, it will help conserve soil moisture and enhance growth. R. rosea is very drought tolerant and does not require irrigation, however, it will benefit from regular watering - natural or otherwise. Field spacing depends on the chosen weed control system, especially if plastic mulch is used. One foot in-row spacing, with eight-inch between-row spacing of plants is an average for current trials, giving three to four rows of plants per (mulched) bed. Path spacing between beds will vary with the weeding regime, or a solid (pathless) planting may be prefered.sun or partial shademoist100 eachPerennial, fleshy succulent. Rhodiola rosea is quite variable depending on location. This seed was collected in Russia. The dried roots are rose-scented, loaded with immune stimulating glycosides (e.g. rosavin, rosin). Uplifting adaptogenic properties similar to Eleuthero Ginseng. Prefers limey soil or rock garden. Not very heat tolerant. Flowers to 10 inches.

Time to harvest can be as short as three growing seasons, when roots can attain 0.75% rosavin content or better, though four to five year's growth will provide greater root biomass and a rosavin content of 1% or more. The roots tend to deteriorate from within as they age, harboring patches of necrotic tissue (or "heartrot") to which they will eventually succumb. The upshot is that - while there may be 75-year old plants in the wild - the maximum age of a commercial field may only be six or seven years. The dynamics of root attrition due to disease are not yet understood, and may differ with various cultivars and soil conditions. Initial indications are that fertilization is not benificial under normal conditions.

R. rosea is an adaptable species, and as such appears to do well in a variety of soil types, from rocky gravel through heavy clay to silty, sandy and peaty loam soil types. The relationship between soil pH and rosavin levels is presently poorly understood, but may favor acidity - ? As a circumpolar species, Rhodiola does well at high latitudes, where its production of rosavins assists survival under harsh conditions. How it performs in warmer climates will be an interesting experiment.
Adaptogen, Antidepressant, Immunostimulant
63Rhodiola, Scandanavian; Golden Root; Rose RootCrassulaceaeRhodiola rosea (dg fo pf wp)42Germination benefits greatly from cold conditioning/stratification, possibly ~ 6 weeks at 5 Celcius or colder, though typically seed is sown on moist sterilized potting soil (in plugtrays - 72 cell trays are popular) during the winter and placed outside for two months or more, preferably with snow cover. Seeds can be covered lightly or pressed into the soil surface, but should not be buried too deeply or allowed to dry out completely. In Canada, sprouts appear in late April or early May, after daytime temperatures increase, and can withstand significant frosts. Alternatively, strategies which utilize or mimic ethylene gas may also promote germination. Young seedlings grow slowly, and do better in a location semi-sheltered from sun and wind. They grow slowly, suffering both when the soil remains saturated with moisture for extended periods and when the soil becomes very dry. Thus a balance between overwatering and drought conditions should be maintained. Mild fertilization may be beneficial, but is not required. After a month or two, when a stalk is sent up from the rosette of seed leaves, seedlings can be exposed to more sun to maximize growth. Seedlings can be transplanted in their first year, but can also be kept in plugtrays for a year or two to minimize weeding in the field. Excellent transplant survival rates can be achieved any time the ground is not frozen, even with dormant (leafless) plugs in the fall. Eventually plant growth will suffer if seedlings are not planted out. -- GORDON STEINRATHS127Ideal growing site components include full or almost full sun, good drainage during the spring runoff and some shelter from the wind. While the latter is not imperitive, it will help conserve soil moisture and enhance growth. R. rosea is very drought tolerant and does not require irrigation, however, it will benefit from regular watering - natural or otherwise. Field spacing depends on the chosen weed control system, especially if plastic mulch is used. One foot in-row spacing, with eight-inch between-row spacing of plants is an average for current trials, giving three to four rows of plants per (mulched) bed. Path spacing between beds will vary with the weeding regime, or a solid (pathless) planting may be prefered.sun or partial shademoist100 eachPerennial, fleshy succulent. Rhodiola rosea is quite variable depending on origin. This seed originated from Norway.The photo is characteristic of its form. The dried roots are rose-scented, loaded with immune stimulating glycosides (e.g. rosavin, rosin). Uplifting adaptogenic properties similar to Eleuthero Ginseng. These plants are not very heat tolerant and will do best at elevation and in the north.

Time to harvest can be as short as three growing seasons, when roots can attain 0.75% rosavin content or better, though four to five year's growth will provide greater root biomass and a rosavin content of 1% or more. The roots tend to deteriorate from within as they age, harboring patches of necrotic tissue (or "heartrot") to which they will eventually succumb. The upshot is that - while there may be 75-year old plants in the wild - the maximum age of a commercial field may only be six or seven years. The dynamics of root attrition due to disease are not yet understood, and may differ with various cultivars and soil conditions. Initial indications are that fertilization is not benificial under normal conditions.

R. rosea is an adaptable species, and as such appears to do well in a variety of soil types, from rocky gravel through heavy clay to silty, sandy and peaty loam soil types. The relationship between soil pH and rosavin levels is presently poorly understood, but may favor acidity - ? As a circumpolar species, Rhodiola does well at high latitudes, where its production of rosavins assists survival under harsh conditions. How it performs in warmer climates will be an interesting experiment.
Adaptogen, Antidepressant, Immunostimulant
65Saint John's WortHypericaceaeHypericum perforatum (dg fo pf wp)30Sow in fall or early spring. Once the soils warm up, germination occurrs in about 30 days. Germination rate is typically 30%, with a palpable amount of hard seed that will reside for years in the soil and finally germinate at a later date. Direct-seeding such small seed is tricky, though, and greenhouse propagation of seedlings works really well with this plant.Saint John's Wort prefers full sun, regular garden soil and is perfectly cold hardy. May it bless your life, as warming as a ray of sun.full sun500 eachHerbaceous perennial native to Europe and naturalized worldwide. There are many species of Hypericum, and due to the delicate chemistry of the plant it really makes sense to use verified material. This is wild-harvested seed of Hypericum perforatum from the Siskiyou Mountains of Southern Oregon, and the mother plants have been tested for the entire array of hypericin-like constituents as well as flavonoid markers, performing very admirably. This is an official and potent strain.Antidepressant
76Vervain, BlueVerbenaceaeVerbena hastata (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-27 00:00:00other14Sow in the early spring or give 2 weeks cold conditioning by putting seeds in moist medium in a plastic bag in the fridge (not freezer) and then sow in warm soil. Germ in 2 to 4 weeks. Space plants 6 inches apart.

Seed: sow early spring in a greenhouse or cold frame and only just cover the seed. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer.

Division in spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring.

Basal cuttings in early summer. Harvest the shoots with plenty of underground stem when they are about 8 - 10cm above the ground. Pot them up into individual pots and keep them in light shade in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer.

Succeeds in any moderately fertile well-drained but moisture retentive soil in a sunny position. Plants are hardy to about -20°c.

Plants prefer full sun to part shade and moist garden soils. Good drainage is not a necessary prerequisite. If there is a concern that the plant will spread, then keep it in a pot, or provide other suitable barriers.sun or partial shademoist200 eachUpright, creeping, self-seeding herbaceous perennial significant in medicine and ritual. Native to the Eastern US. Bright blue flowers on reddish-tinted plants, in multiple, long-lasting, handsome spikes.

Fresh or dried leaf, in tincture or tea, is a bitter remedy for treating indigestion, colds, and fevers. A good ingredient for home brew, it is also a traditional offering plant to honor the garden spirits. The plant will placate ills, real or imagined. Once imagined, ills become real, don't they? It's a quirk of the human condition that most of us would like to escape. Vervain helps you escape.

The leaves and roots are used medicinally; roots are more active than the leaves. The plant is used in the treatment of stomach aches, gravel, worms and scrofula. An infusion of the roots, leaves or seeds has been used in the early stages of fevers. A snuff made from the dried flowers has been used to treat nose bleeds.

Seed are edible cooked. The seed can be roasted and ground into a powder or used whole as a piñole. Pleasantly bitter, some of this bitterness can be removed by leeching the flour. The leaves are used as a tea substitute.
Antidepressant, Antiperiodic, Beverage, Diaphoretic, Emetic, Expectorant, Food, Ornamental, Tonic, Vermifuge, Vulnerary
78Wilde Dagga; Wild Dagga; Lion’s Tail; Lion’s Ears; UmunyaneLamiaceaeLeonotus leonurus (dg fo pf wp)7Sow seeds in a flat or pot. Barely cover, tamp well, keep evenly moist, warm and in the light until germination, which occurs in 1 to 3 weeks. The seedlings are valuable and so normally not thinned -- grow at close spacing for a few weeks until the second set of true leaves has formed, then prick into pots, and then after they grow out a bit more, transplant outdoors to 3 feet apart. In cold weather areas, you may wish to keep this plant in potted culture.Plant prefers full sun to part shade and regular garden or wayside conditions. Since the stems can become quite woody, it holds up well to traffic and random abuse. Well-drained, slightly alkaline soils seem to be the best choice, although almost any soil will work as long as the summer is hot and long. The plant is quite drought tolerant. sun or partial shadedrought tolerantgarden30 eachHerbaceous perennial, may become a woody perennial in zone 8 and warmer. When growing in colder zones, these can be very late to re-emerge from the woody stumps of the previous year's growth. Flowers in the late season on multiple upright stalks, occuring as long-tubed, hairy appendages emerging from the globose, whorled orbs. Hummingbirds become frenzied around this plant, and I've had them fly in through the door of the greenhouse (and risk hitting their little heads) in order to repeatedly visit a single flower that was making an out-of-season display.

Easily one of the showiest medicinals of all time. Native to South Africa and planted in discriminating botanical gardens worldwide. When encountered on garden path, it is a breathtaker. Speaking of taking a breath, this is a smokeable euphoric, the dried leaves and buds being used throughout history by the native peoples of South Africa as a calming, reality shifting smoke. Decoction or tea of leaves and roots also used traditionally as an external wash against snakebite, other bites and stings (and believe me, in Africa, this is useful!), boils, eczema, skin diseases, itching, and muscular cramps. The same type of preparation is used internally for treating coughs, colds, influenza, bronchitis, high blood pressure and headaches. The plant is powerfully endowed with marrubiin and related compounds.

Please note: For a similar display (and entheogenic effect) in colder areas, choose "Cordao," (Leonotis nepetafolia) which is the annual counterpart of wilde dagga and also has a wide distribution in East and Southern Africa.
Analgesic, Antidepressant, Insectiary, Ornamental

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