Plant used for/Adaptogen

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Adaptogen
Helps relieve stress, thus preventing the many chronic degenerative diseases.

For more information

Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for plants that are used as Adaptogen:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
15AshwagandhaSolanaceaeWithania somnifera (dg fo pf wp)2012-03-30 00:00:00120 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant15Light dependent germinator. Sow in early spring indoors or in the greenhouse. Average germ time 15 days. Space 1 foot apart.Plant prefers full sun, fast-draining, alkaline (pH 7.5 to 8.0) soil and dryish conditions. Sweeten regular garden soil with ground limestone. Grows 2 to 3 feet tall, producing eventually the lantern-like pods enclosing the pea-sized fruits, green at first and becoming bright red as the inflated calyx dries and becomes transparent.well drainedHardiness: to 15 degrees F but quite intolerant of moist soils in winter.

The plant is an evergreen woody shrub in the tropics and hot desert areas, and acts like an herbaceous perennial in temperate zone 8 and warmer. Native to Africa, an ecotype with large leaves and very fast growth.

In native medicine, dried root is considered a sexual tonic.
Adaptogen, Aphrodisiac
9Astragalus; Huang-qiFabaceaeAstragalus membranaceus (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-28 00:00:0080 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant21Scarify seed lightly, and use rhizobium inoculant. Direct seed in early spring. Good cold soil germinator and a poor warm soil germinator. Germ in 3 to 10 days. Thin to 6 inches apart.

Seed best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. A period of cold stratification may help stored seed to germinate. Stored seed, and perhaps also fresh seed, should be pre-soaked for 24 hours in hot water before sowing - but make sure that you do not cook the seed. Any seed that does not swell should be carefully pricked with a needle, taking care not to damage the embryo, and re-soaked for a further 24 hours.

Germination can be slow and erratic but is usually within 4 - 9 weeks or more at 13°c if the seed is treated or sown fresh.

As soon as it is large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter, planting them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.
1460Plant is a sturdy survivor, and prefers full sun, average soil, and good drainage.

Requires a dry well-drained soil in a sunny position. Prefers a sandy slightly alkaline soil. Plants are hardy to at least -15°c.

Plants are intolerant of root disturbance and are best planted in their final positions whilst still small. Many members of this genus can be difficult to grow, this may be due partly to a lack of their specific bacterial associations in the soil.
full sunwell drainedsandy50 eachTaprooted herbaceous perennial native to China.

King of tonic herbs. It is an anabolic immunostimulant, that may be dried and ground up, then used for making tea, decoction, or tincture. As a fresh root, may be boiled in soup to release its life-supportive essence.

Plants flower yellow-white to 4 feet tall.

Huang Qi is commonly used in Chinese herbalism, where it is considered to be one of the 50 fundamental herbs.

The root is a sweet tonic herb that stimulates the immune system and many organs of the body, whilst lowering blood pressure and blood sugar levels. It is particularly suited to young, physically active people, increasing stamina and endurance and improving resistance to the cold - indeed for younger people it is perhaps superior to ginseng in this respect.

Huang Qi is used especially for treatment of the kidneys and also to avoid senility. The plant is often used in conjunction with other herbs such as Atractylodes macrocephala and Ledebouriella seseloides.

The root contains a number of bio-active constituents including saponins and isoflavonoids.

It is used in the treatment of cancer, prolapse of the uterus or anus, abscesses and chronic ulcers, chronic nephritis with oedema and proteinuria. Recent research in the West has shown that the root can increase the production of interferon and macrophages and thus help restore normal immune function in cancer patients. Patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy recover faster and live longer if given Huang Qi concurrently.

The root of 4 year old plants is harvested in the autumn and dried for later use.
NitrogenAdaptogen, Antibacterial, Cancer, Cardiotonic, Diuretic, Febrifuge, Hypoglycaemic, Hypotensive, Immunostimulant, Pectoral, Tonic, Uterine tonic, Vasodilator
237Basil, Holy, TulsiLamiaceaeOcimum sanctum (dg fo pf wp)2013-03-15 00:00:00400 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant250 eachAdaptogen, Antidermatosic, Antifungal, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, Antipyretic, Antitussive, Antiviral, Anxiolytic, Cardiac, Carminative, Diuretic, Expectorant, Febrifuge, Immunomodulator, Lithontripic, Mouthwash, Ophthalmic, Pectoral, Seasoning, Stings
10Codonopsis; Dang-shenCampanulaceaeCodonopsis pilosula (dg fo pf wp)7Sow in spring. Watch out for gophers, these roots are tastier than carrots!

Do not allow the compost to dry out. The seed usually germinates in 1 - 6 weeks at 20°c. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer and protect them from slugs until the plants are well established.

DIVISION in spring, with care, since the plant resents root disturbance. We have found it best to take small divisions that are teased out from the sides of the main clump so as to cause the least possible disturbance to the plants and to avoid having to dig up the clump. These small divisions need to be potted up and placed in light shade in a greenhouse until they are rooting well. They can be planted out into their permanent positions in the summer if they are large enough, otherwise in the following spring.
Plant prefers full sun to part shade and something to climb on -- preferably another plant but lacking that at least a string.sun or partial shadewell drainedgarden100 eachTwining and vining perennial native to China.

"Poor Man's Ginseng" builds chi and tonifys the blood. A fascinating climbing plant with bell-shaped blossoms. The roots are crunchy, very sweet, quite delicious. The herb in TCM is the pressed and dried, rolled root that is sugary and chewy. Highly recommended.

Adaptogen, Appetizer, Digestive, Galactogogue, Sialagogue, Stomachic, Tonic
25Eleuthero; Ci-wu-jiaAraliaceaeEleutherococcus snticosus (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-27 00:00:00144 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant730Sow in flats left in the shadehouse, shade garden, or in moist, cool woods. Mulch on top of flat in order to keep seed from drying out during the germination cycle. Use well-rotted sawdust, forest duff or (our favorite) hydrated coir. Fresh seed from our own farm is delivered stratified and in moist medium, giving quicker and more dependable germination than dried seed. (Fresh seed from the 2010 harvest is out of stock. Fresh seed will be harvested again in December of 2011.) Space 3 to 5 feet apart. Flowers to 12 feet.full shademoistrich20 eachWoody perennial with spiny stem and clusters of blue-black berries.

Classic adaptogen. The root helps you adapt to stress.

Native to cold northern lakeshores and woods of China and Siberia. For us, this plant grows best in the deep woods where there is rich soil and plenty of water.

Please note: Domestic (USA) orders will receive fresh, stratified seeds in coir from our own organic harvest, delivery December 2011. International orders, due to phytosanitary restrictions on fresh seeds, will receive the dried seeds from Siberia=150 seeds per packet.

Also note: If you are a domestic (US) customer and would like the dried seeds immediately, please order this item and let us know in the "customer comments" field at checkout. We'll send the dried seeds pronto, planto.

Germination note on dried Eleutherococcus seed: We planted 100 seeds in a gallon pot on 2/24/07 placed in a cool, moist and shady spot in our shadeouse. We noted vigorous germination at 27% on 3/17/09, a 2 year induction period. Basically, it requires the right conditions combined with the passage of 2 vernal cycles to get good germ.

The misnomer Siberian Ginseng was never appropriate for identifying this plant.
Adaptogen
34Gotu Kola; BrahmiApiaceaeHydrocotyl asiatica (dg fo pf wp)30Gotu kola is actually somewhat difficult to start from seed. Remember, it is a pioneer successional plant, with seeds that may remain dormant in the soil for decades until the right conditions occur for germination. Use a very well-draining mix (I've had zero germination in pots containing regular potting soil, except for one seed that was pinched between two pots and sprouted there -- clearly a situation of "excellent drainage." So, the best approach is to plant in greenhouse conditions in very excellently drained soil, just pressed into the surface of the soil, in which case the seeds will probably germinate in 30 to 90 days. Seed sown in the unheated greenhouse in the fall may give substantially better germination rates, but the germination time is likely to be up to 6 months. Division is simple at any time in the growing season, though the spring is probably best. We find that it is best to pot up the divisions until they are rooting away well, though in selected mild gardens it should be possible to plant the divisions out directly into their permanent positions.Old stone walls and rocky sunny places in lowland hills and especially by the coast in central and southern Japan. Shady, damp and wet places such as paddy fields, and in grass thickets.sun or partial shademoistpoor50 eachGotu kola is an outstandingly important medicinal herb. Its Indian name is 'Brahmi' which means 'bringing knowledge of the Supreme Reality' and it has long been used there medicinally and as an aid to meditation.

It is a useful tonic and cleansing herb for skin problems and digestive disorders. In India it is chiefly valued as a revitalizing herb that strengthens nervous function and memory.

The whole plant is alterative, cardio-depressant, hypotensive, weakly sedative and tonic. It is a rejuvenating diuretic herb that clears toxins, reduces inflammations and fevers, improves healing and immunity, improves the memory and has a balancing effect on the nervous system.

It has been suggested that regular use of the herb can rejuvenate the nervous system and it therefore deserves attention as a possible cure for a wide range of nervous disorders including multiple sclerosis. Recent research has shown that gotu kola reduces scarring, improves circulatory problems in the lower limbs and speeds the healing process.

It is used internally in the treatment of wounds, chronic skin conditions (including leprosy), venereal diseases, malaria, varicose veins, ulcers, nervous disorders and senility.

Externally, the herb is applied to wounds, haemorrhoids and rheumatic joints.

The plant can be harvested at any time of the year, fresh or dried. Some report the dried herb quickly loses its medicinal properties and so is best used fresh.
Adaptogen, Antiinflammatory, Cardiac, Depurative, Diuretic, Febrifuge, Hypotensive, Nervine, Sedative, Skin, Tonic
36Heimia; Sinkuiche; Sun Opener; Sinicuichi; Shrubby Yellowcrest; Elixir of the SunLythraceaeHeimia salicifolia (dg fo pf wp)Very small seed -- press into surface of potting soil and keep moist until germination. Keep seedlings in a gallon pot for a year before transplanting outdoors, or maintain the plant in a large pot, as it does reasonalble well in potted culture.Does well in pots. The plant prefers a warm exposure -- full sun, fast-draining soils. I'd guess they are hardy to 20 degrees F. Heimia is really a woody bush, and the yellow flowers are very nice. The bush can be trimmed like a hedge, and it doeesn't mind this treatment a bit.full sunwell drained500 eachWoody or herbaceous perennial bee plant bearing large yellow flowers. This plant is a source of the alkaloidal molecule known as crogenine, which is partially responsible for the hypotensive and sedative effects. Traditionally, the wilted leaves are made into a sun tea, allowed to brew and ferment for at least 24 hours before straining and drinking. The tea encourages a sense of well-being, tinting the vision with amber light, assisting with recollection of past events while promoting calmness and a sense of unity with all nature.Adaptogen, Hypotensive, Insectiary, Sedative
39Jiao-gu-lanCucurbitaceaeGynostemma pentaphyllum (dg fo pf wp)21Seeds germinate in 3 to 6 weeks in warm soil.Plant prefers part shade, well-drained and nitrogen rich soil, and is hardy to 20 degrees F. Makes an excellent indoor plant. Does well in pots.partial shadewell drained25 eachHardiness:Hardier than previously reported--at least down to 20 degrees f. Does go winter dormant.

Herbaceous perennial vine native to China and Japan.

The dried leaves of this plant make a tasty, energy-filled tea that contains 4 times more ginseng-like saponins than Asian or American ginseng.
NitrogenAdaptogen
49Maca, Red; Maca RojoBrassicaceaeLepidium peruvianum (dg fo pf wp)6Sow the seed on the surface of the seed bed, stir it around with your fingers, then tamp in securely. Thin to 6 inch spacing, and harvest after the first year of growth. For most localities, best to direct-seed in September and harvest in May or so, but if your winters are very snowy I don't think this will probably work. In the case of snowy winters (zone 6 and under) I would plant this as a quick fall or spring crop and harvest small roots. We planted MACA for three years before we worked out a reasonable scenario and took in our first good roots, then a seed crop. Also, anything of this nature depends on the weather patterns of the year in question. As always, we encourage experimentation and the feedback we're getting is encouraging -- positive reports have been received from New Jersey, Santa Cruz and North Dakota. As my teacher always said, "Keep trying."The plant is very tolerant of high intensity sunlight and withstands drastic temperature fluctuations. Plant prefers fall, winter and spring conditions for growth. Full sun and a fast-draining soil is preferred. Maca likes a somewhat alkaline soil, such as decomposed granite or volcanic soils. However, lacking this kind of soil, regular garden soil will do. Composted manures are a good fertilizer for MACA. I don't think the plant will overwinter in less than zone 6, unless perhaps in very dry sites or protected alpine locations. Here in Williams we get very little snow, and the plant grows through the winter, which is preferred, as it gives the plants time to mature, and encourages bulbing (the hypocotyl). If left in the field for 2 years, the root will become quite woody and the plant will go to seed. Probably the best regions for growing maca are high steppes in tropical or subtropical countries, although it is worthwhile to try planting almost anywhere because very little is known about the potential adaptability. All plantings will be experimental until reasonable methodology and timing are worked out.full sunwell drainedgarden100 eachBiennial, radish-like, rosette forming plant native to the high Peruvian Puna. This is a high elevation cultivar that is considered to be medicinally superior to other strains.

The first photo is of a seedling that was direct-seeded outdoors. The new seed is extremely viable and vigorous, giving over 90% germination in 6 days.

Second photo shows the red-purple coloration of the root, which is still at the stage prior to formation of bulbous hypocotyl.
Calcium, Carbohydrate, Iodine, Iron, ProteinAdaptogen, Aphrodisiac, Cancer, Food, Infertility, Nutritive, Tonic
60Pulsatilla; Wind Flower; Pasque FlowerRanunculaceaeAnemone pulsatilla (dg fo pf wp)30Seed has short life span. Lay seed on its side in moist medium and expect germination in 30 to 90 days -- very slow going at first, which is typical with seed of plants that are themselves long-lived.In the case of Pulsatilla, I have 15-year-old plants that are going strong. They don't spread very readily, but the clump enlarges every year, self-mulching with its own leaf detritus. Plant prefers full sun to part shade and dryish, well-drained soils. Thick bark mulches are a helpful adjunct.sun or partial shadewell drained30 eachHerbaceous perennial. Native to Europe. The plant is diminutive but brazen, sending up large, showy purple flowers early in the spring, before most plants are half awake, giving way to upright, feathery seedheads straight out of Dr. Suess.

Low doses of the fresh plant tincture are used to calm nervous disorders associated with menopause, PMS or insomnia.

A classic low-dose botanical, the plant is acrid and should be treated with great respect.
Adaptogen, Ornamental, Sedative
62Rhodiola, Alpine; Golden Root; Rose RootCrassulaceaeRhodiola rosea (dg fo pf wp)42Germination benefits greatly from cold conditioning/stratification, possibly ~ 6 weeks at 5 Celcius or colder, though typically seed is sown on moist sterilized potting soil (in plugtrays - 72 cell trays are popular) during the winter and placed outside for two months or more, preferably with snow cover. Seeds can be covered lightly or pressed into the soil surface, but should not be buried too deeply or allowed to dry out completely. In Canada, sprouts appear in late April or early May, after daytime temperatures increase, and can withstand significant frosts. Alternatively, strategies which utilize or mimic ethylene gas may also promote germination. Young seedlings grow slowly, and do better in a location semi-sheltered from sun and wind. They grow slowly, suffering both when the soil remains saturated with moisture for extended periods and when the soil becomes very dry. Thus a balance between overwatering and drought conditions should be maintained. Mild fertilization may be beneficial, but is not required. After a month or two, when a stalk is sent up from the rosette of seed leaves, seedlings can be exposed to more sun to maximize growth. Seedlings can be transplanted in their first year, but can also be kept in plugtrays for a year or two to minimize weeding in the field. Excellent transplant survival rates can be achieved any time the ground is not frozen, even with dormant (leafless) plugs in the fall. Eventually plant growth will suffer if seedlings are not planted out. -- GORDON STEINRATHS127Ideal growing site components include full or almost full sun, good drainage during the spring runoff and some shelter from the wind. While the latter is not imperitive, it will help conserve soil moisture and enhance growth. R. rosea is very drought tolerant and does not require irrigation, however, it will benefit from regular watering - natural or otherwise. Field spacing depends on the chosen weed control system, especially if plastic mulch is used. One foot in-row spacing, with eight-inch between-row spacing of plants is an average for current trials, giving three to four rows of plants per (mulched) bed. Path spacing between beds will vary with the weeding regime, or a solid (pathless) planting may be prefered.sun or partial shademoist100 eachPerennial, fleshy succulent. Rhodiola rosea is quite variable depending on origin. This seed originated from Austria and Germany, and the photo is characteristic of its form. The dried roots are rose-scented, loaded with immune stimulating glycosides (e.g. rosavin, rosin). Uplifting adaptogenic properties similar to Eleuthero Ginseng. Rhodiola does best at elevation and in the North.

Time to harvest can be as short as three growing seasons, when roots can attain 0.75% rosavin content or better, though four to five year's growth will provide greater root biomass and a rosavin content of 1% or more. The roots tend to deteriorate from within as they age, harboring patches of necrotic tissue (or "heartrot") to which they will eventually succumb. The upshot is that - while there may be 75-year old plants in the wild - the maximum age of a commercial field may only be six or seven years. The dynamics of root attrition due to disease are not yet understood, and may differ with various cultivars and soil conditions. Initial indications are that fertilization is not benificial under normal conditions.

R. rosea is an adaptable species, and as such appears to do well in a variety of soil types, from rocky gravel through heavy clay to silty, sandy and peaty loam soil types. The relationship between soil pH and rosavin levels is presently poorly understood, but may favor acidity - ? As a circumpolar species, Rhodiola does well at high latitudes, where its production of rosavins assists survival under harsh conditions. How it performs in warmer climates will be an interesting experiment.
Adaptogen, Antidepressant, Immunostimulant
64Rhodiola, Russian; Golden Root; Rose RootCrassulaceaeRhodiola rosea (dg fo pf wp)42Germination benefits greatly from cold conditioning/stratification, possibly ~ 6 weeks at 5 Celcius or colder, though typically seed is sown on moist sterilized potting soil (in plugtrays - 72 cell trays are popular) during the winter and placed outside for two months or more, preferably with snow cover. Seeds can be covered lightly or pressed into the soil surface, but should not be buried too deeply or allowed to dry out completely. In Canada, sprouts appear in late April or early May, after daytime temperatures increase, and can withstand significant frosts. Alternatively, strategies which utilize or mimic ethylene gas may also promote germination. Young seedlings grow slowly, and do better in a location semi-sheltered from sun and wind. They grow slowly, suffering both when the soil remains saturated with moisture for extended periods and when the soil becomes very dry. Thus a balance between overwatering and drought conditions should be maintained. Mild fertilization may be beneficial, but is not required. After a month or two, when a stalk is sent up from the rosette of seed leaves, seedlings can be exposed to more sun to maximize growth. Seedlings can be transplanted in their first year, but can also be kept in plugtrays for a year or two to minimize weeding in the field. Excellent transplant survival rates can be achieved any time the ground is not frozen, even with dormant (leafless) plugs in the fall. Eventually plant growth will suffer if seedlings are not planted out. -- GORDON STEINRATHS127Ideal growing site components include full or almost full sun, good drainage during the spring runoff and some shelter from the wind. While the latter is not imperitive, it will help conserve soil moisture and enhance growth. R. rosea is very drought tolerant and does not require irrigation, however, it will benefit from regular watering - natural or otherwise. Field spacing depends on the chosen weed control system, especially if plastic mulch is used. One foot in-row spacing, with eight-inch between-row spacing of plants is an average for current trials, giving three to four rows of plants per (mulched) bed. Path spacing between beds will vary with the weeding regime, or a solid (pathless) planting may be prefered.sun or partial shademoist100 eachPerennial, fleshy succulent. Rhodiola rosea is quite variable depending on location. This seed was collected in Russia. The dried roots are rose-scented, loaded with immune stimulating glycosides (e.g. rosavin, rosin). Uplifting adaptogenic properties similar to Eleuthero Ginseng. Prefers limey soil or rock garden. Not very heat tolerant. Flowers to 10 inches.

Time to harvest can be as short as three growing seasons, when roots can attain 0.75% rosavin content or better, though four to five year's growth will provide greater root biomass and a rosavin content of 1% or more. The roots tend to deteriorate from within as they age, harboring patches of necrotic tissue (or "heartrot") to which they will eventually succumb. The upshot is that - while there may be 75-year old plants in the wild - the maximum age of a commercial field may only be six or seven years. The dynamics of root attrition due to disease are not yet understood, and may differ with various cultivars and soil conditions. Initial indications are that fertilization is not benificial under normal conditions.

R. rosea is an adaptable species, and as such appears to do well in a variety of soil types, from rocky gravel through heavy clay to silty, sandy and peaty loam soil types. The relationship between soil pH and rosavin levels is presently poorly understood, but may favor acidity - ? As a circumpolar species, Rhodiola does well at high latitudes, where its production of rosavins assists survival under harsh conditions. How it performs in warmer climates will be an interesting experiment.
Adaptogen, Antidepressant, Immunostimulant
63Rhodiola, Scandanavian; Golden Root; Rose RootCrassulaceaeRhodiola rosea (dg fo pf wp)42Germination benefits greatly from cold conditioning/stratification, possibly ~ 6 weeks at 5 Celcius or colder, though typically seed is sown on moist sterilized potting soil (in plugtrays - 72 cell trays are popular) during the winter and placed outside for two months or more, preferably with snow cover. Seeds can be covered lightly or pressed into the soil surface, but should not be buried too deeply or allowed to dry out completely. In Canada, sprouts appear in late April or early May, after daytime temperatures increase, and can withstand significant frosts. Alternatively, strategies which utilize or mimic ethylene gas may also promote germination. Young seedlings grow slowly, and do better in a location semi-sheltered from sun and wind. They grow slowly, suffering both when the soil remains saturated with moisture for extended periods and when the soil becomes very dry. Thus a balance between overwatering and drought conditions should be maintained. Mild fertilization may be beneficial, but is not required. After a month or two, when a stalk is sent up from the rosette of seed leaves, seedlings can be exposed to more sun to maximize growth. Seedlings can be transplanted in their first year, but can also be kept in plugtrays for a year or two to minimize weeding in the field. Excellent transplant survival rates can be achieved any time the ground is not frozen, even with dormant (leafless) plugs in the fall. Eventually plant growth will suffer if seedlings are not planted out. -- GORDON STEINRATHS127Ideal growing site components include full or almost full sun, good drainage during the spring runoff and some shelter from the wind. While the latter is not imperitive, it will help conserve soil moisture and enhance growth. R. rosea is very drought tolerant and does not require irrigation, however, it will benefit from regular watering - natural or otherwise. Field spacing depends on the chosen weed control system, especially if plastic mulch is used. One foot in-row spacing, with eight-inch between-row spacing of plants is an average for current trials, giving three to four rows of plants per (mulched) bed. Path spacing between beds will vary with the weeding regime, or a solid (pathless) planting may be prefered.sun or partial shademoist100 eachPerennial, fleshy succulent. Rhodiola rosea is quite variable depending on origin. This seed originated from Norway.The photo is characteristic of its form. The dried roots are rose-scented, loaded with immune stimulating glycosides (e.g. rosavin, rosin). Uplifting adaptogenic properties similar to Eleuthero Ginseng. These plants are not very heat tolerant and will do best at elevation and in the north.

Time to harvest can be as short as three growing seasons, when roots can attain 0.75% rosavin content or better, though four to five year's growth will provide greater root biomass and a rosavin content of 1% or more. The roots tend to deteriorate from within as they age, harboring patches of necrotic tissue (or "heartrot") to which they will eventually succumb. The upshot is that - while there may be 75-year old plants in the wild - the maximum age of a commercial field may only be six or seven years. The dynamics of root attrition due to disease are not yet understood, and may differ with various cultivars and soil conditions. Initial indications are that fertilization is not benificial under normal conditions.

R. rosea is an adaptable species, and as such appears to do well in a variety of soil types, from rocky gravel through heavy clay to silty, sandy and peaty loam soil types. The relationship between soil pH and rosavin levels is presently poorly understood, but may favor acidity - ? As a circumpolar species, Rhodiola does well at high latitudes, where its production of rosavins assists survival under harsh conditions. How it performs in warmer climates will be an interesting experiment.
Adaptogen, Antidepressant, Immunostimulant

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