Plant supplies/Potassium

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Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for plants that supply Potassium:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
20BorageBoraginaceaeBorago officinalis (dg fo pf wp)Sow in early spring, directly in the garden, and expect flowers by midsummer.80Plant prefers full sun to part shade and moist soils.sun or partial shademoist100 eachAnnual or overwintering annual. 80 days to maturity. Native to the Mediterranean. This vigorous self-seeder would seem weedy if it were less pretty. As it is, its always a welcome sight in the garden, where it emerges when and where it likes. Children love to eat the nodding, blue and purple flowers that gladden the heart.Potassium, SilicaInsectiary
91Cabbage, ErmosaBrassicaceaeBrassica oleracea (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-04 00:00:00121 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant6Sow indoors beginning in March and transplant outdoors from April to the end of July. Overwintering cabbage is sown outdoors during July. Optimal soil temperature: 10-30°C (50-85°F). Seeds should germinate in 7-10 days.

Sow 3 or 4 seeds per pot, 5mm (¼") deep, under very bright light. Thin to the strongest plant. Space transplants 45-60cm (18-24") apart in rows 60-90cm (24-36") apart.


In optimum conditions at least 80% of seeds should germinate. Usual seed life: 3 years. Per 100' row: 200 seeds, per acre: 44M seeds.
95Cabbage does best in humus-rich soil amended with composted manure. Mix ½ cup complete organic fertilizer into the soil beneath each transplant. If growth slows, side dress with a little more complete organic fertilizer. heads of early varieties can split from over-maturity, rapid growth after heavy rain, or irrigation after dry spells. Splits can be delayed by twisting the plant or cultivating deeply next to plants in order to break roots and slow growth. Fall and winter varieties stand in the garden longer without splitting. If direct sown, add 20-25 days to the maturity date. Cabbage heads are ready when they're firm to the touch, and when the interior is fairly dense. Heads will split when they're allowed to overly mature. Rapid growth due to excess watering and fertility will also cause splitting of the head. Plant early, midseason and late varieties to spread out your harvest. Late varieties tend to be better for storage or for making sauerkraut. Early varieties tend not to store well.full sunrich1 gramsCooks appreciate this big savoy for salads. Ermosa is in wonderful cole slaw, or to wrap fillings. Savoy cabbages have a rich full flavour. Ermosa is a fancy, late-season variety for planting late spring and fall and winter harvest. Very uniform, round 15-18cm (6-7inches) heads have a short core. Ermosa cabbage heads are filled densely with creamy yellow interior leaves. Ermosa holds up well into the fall and withstands winter rains.

Cabbage is full of nutrients. To preserve its vitamins and mineral content, do not overcook cabbage. Avoid cooking in aluminum pans to keep the smell down. Cabbages are highly ornamental in the garden-choose varieties for colour (deep-red, blue-green, dark-green) and leaf texture (savoyed or flat leaf).

Diseases

Purple blotch (Alternaria porri) - Avoid wetting foliage if possible. Water early in the day so plant parts above the ground dry as quickly as possible. Allow for air circulation, and avoid crowding plants. Pull weeds around plants and garden area to increase air circulation. When plants are not wet, remove and destroy affected plant parts. In autumn rake and destroy all fallen or diseased leaves and fruit.

Clubroot - If soil infested, add lime to raise soil pH to 7.2. Locate new plants in part of garden different from previous year's location. If that is not possible, remove infested soil and replace with fresh soil. Purchase healthy transplants or start seed in sterile potting mix or fresh ground. Remove and discard or destroy entire infested plant along with immediately surrounding soil and soil clinging to roots.

Pests:

Flea Beetles - Use row covers to help protect plants from early damage. Put in place at planting and remove before temperatures get too hot in midsummer. Control weeds.

Cutworms - Control weeds. Cardboard collars around each plant give good protection.

Cabbage root maggot - White maggot larvae tunnel in and feed on roots of plants. Damage causes wilting early on, death of plants later on. Use row covers to help protect plants from early damage.

Cabbageworms - Handpick and destroy. Row covers may be useful on small plantings to help protect plants from early damage. Put in place at planting and remove before temperatures get too hot in midsummer.

Cabbage aphids - A hard stream of water can be used to remove aphids from plants. Wash off with water occasionally as needed early in the day. Check for evidence of natural enemies such as gray-brown or bloated parasitized aphids and the presence of alligator-like larvae of lady beetles and lacewings.

Boron, Calcium, Chromium, Copper, Fibre: Non-Soluble, Iron, Nitrogen, Potassium, Sulfur, ZincFood
102Cabbage, Red AcreBrassicaceaeBrassica oleracea (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-11 00:00:0050% germ610025 gramsCompact plants with short stems produce solid, five to seven inches in diameter, round, flattened, red-purple colored heads weighing two to four pounds. Stands well and is one of the best varieties for storage. Yellows resistant.Boron, Calcium, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Potassium, Sulfur, ZincFood
95Cabbage, Sue Choi China ExpressBrassicaceaeBrassica oleracea (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-03 00:00:00169 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant6Sow indoors beginning in March and transplant outdoors from April to the end of July. Overwintering cabbage is sown outdoors during July. Optimal soil temperature: 10-30°C (50-85°F). Seeds should germinate in 7-10 days.

Sow 3 or 4 seeds per pot, 5mm (¼") deep, under very bright light. Thin to the strongest plant. Space transplants 45-60cm (18-24") apart in rows 60-90cm (24-36") apart.

In optimum conditions at least 80% of seeds should germinate. Usual seed life: 3 years. Per 100' row: 200 seeds, per acre: 44M seeds.
65Ideal pH: 6.5-7.0. Cabbage does best in humus-rich soil amended with composted manure. Mix ½ cup complete organic fertilizer into the soil beneath each transplant. If growth slows, side dress with a little more complete organic fertilizer. heads of early varieties can split from over-maturity, rapid growth after heavy rain, or irrigation after dry spells. Splits can be delayed by twisting the plant or cultivating deeply next to plants in order to break roots and slow growth. Fall and winter varieties stand in the garden longer without splitting. If direct sown, add 20-25 days to the maturity date.full sunrich2 gramsThis Chinese cabbage is often marketed as sui choi. These sweet, crisp greens are ideal for salads and a mainstay of the stir-fry. Big, broad, barrel-shaped, and pale-green heads are tightly packed and 0.6-2.2kg (11/2-5lb) after trimming. This variety has good bolt resistance and excellent uniformity. For full-sized heads sow in summer with the last planting 10 weeks before frost. Established plants are vigorous and will stand in the garden until freezes get severe. However, seedlings will bolt if they are exposed to temperatures below 10ºC (50ºF) for more than 2 weeks; so protect early spring planting with cloches.

Cabbage is full of nutrients. To preserve its vitamins and mineral content, do not overcook cabbage. Avoid cooking in aluminum pans to keep the smell down. Cabbages are highly ornamental in the garden-choose varieties for colour (deep-red, blue-green, dark-green) and leaf texture (savoyed or flat leaf).

Cabbage heads are ready when they're firm to the touch, and when the interior is fairly dense. Heads will split when they're allowed to overly mature. Rapid growth due to excess watering and fertility will also cause splitting of the head. Plant early, midseason and late varieties to spread out your harvest. Late varieties tend to be better for storage or for making sauerkraut. Early varieties tend not to store well.

Diseases

Purple blotch (Alternaria porri) - Avoid wetting foliage if possible. Water early in the day so plant parts above the ground dry as quickly as possible. Allow for air circulation, and avoid crowding plants. Pull weeds around plants and garden area to increase air circulation. When plants are not wet, remove and destroy affected plant parts. In autumn rake and destroy all fallen or diseased leaves and fruit.

Clubroot - If soil infested, add lime to raise soil pH to 7.2. Locate new plants in part of garden different from previous year's location. If that is not possible, remove infested soil and replace with fresh soil. Purchase healthy transplants or start seed in sterile potting mix or fresh ground. Remove and discard or destroy entire infested plant along with immediately surrounding soil and soil clinging to roots.

Flea Beetles - Use row covers to help protect plants from early damage. Put in place at planting and remove before temperatures get too hot in midsummer. Control weeds.

Cutworms - Control weeds. Cardboard collars around each plant give good protection.

Cabbage root maggot - White maggot larvae tunnel in and feed on roots of plants. Damage causes wilting early on, death of plants later on. Use row covers to help protect plants from early damage.

Cabbageworms - Handpick and destroy. Row covers may be useful on small plantings to help protect plants from early damage. Put in place at planting and remove before temperatures get too hot in midsummer.

Cabbage aphids - A hard stream of water can be used to remove aphids from plants. Wash off with water occasionally as needed early in the day. Check for evidence of natural enemies such as gray-brown or bloated parasitized aphids and the presence of alligator-like larvae of lady beetles and lacewings.
Boron, Calcium, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Nitrogen, Potassium, Sulfur, ZincFood
99Carrot, Purple DragonApiaceaeDaucus carota (dg fo pf wp)7Direct sow April to mid-July for harvests from July to November. Sow at 3 week intervals for a continuous harvest. Optimal soil temperature: 7-30°C (45-85°F). Seeds take as long as 14-21 days to germinate.

Because carrot seeds are tiny, they need to be sown shallowly. The trick is to keep the top-most layer of soil damp during the long germination period. Water deeply prior to planting. Direct sow the tiny seeds 5mm (¼") deep, 4 seeds per 2cm (1"), and firm soil lightly after seeding. Make sure the seeds are only just buried. Water the area with the gentlest stream you can provide, and keep it constantly moist until the seeds sprout.

In optimal conditions at least 60% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 3 years. Per 100' row: 2.4M seeds, per acre: 1,044M seeds. Rates are for raw, not pelleted seeds.
60Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. The softer and more humus-based the soil, the better. When soil is dry enough in spring, work it to a fine texture. Broadcast and dig in ½ cup complete organic fertilizer for every 3m (10') of row. Avoid fresh manure. Carrots will become misshapen, but still edible if they hit anything hard as they grow down into the soil. Keep weeded and watered. It is very important to thin carrots in order to allow them room to grow, and so they don't compete for available nutrients, moisture, and light. Then to 4-10cm (1½-4") when the young plants are 2cm (1") tall. Use wider spacing to get larger roots. As they grow, carrots push up, out of the soil, so hill soil up to prevent getting a green shoulder.full sunwell drainedrich50 gramsDragons have dark red to purple skins, but a regular orange carrot interior. Packed with nutrients, Dragons look great raw or cooked.

Carrots are second only to beets in sugar content, and they're packed with beta carotene, vitamins, minerals, and fibre. They also happen to be delicious and easy to grow!

Carrots can be harvested at any size, but flavour is best when the carrot has turned bright orange. After harvest, store at cold temperatures just above 0ºC. You can store in sand or sawdust, or simply leave carrots under heaped soil in the garden during the winter, and pull as you need them.

The Carrot Rust Fly - This pest lays its eggs at the base of the growing carrots. The larva of the fly chews tunnels and unsightly grooves through the surface of the root, causing rot. Unfortunately the damage isn't just cosmetic; the activities of the Carrot Rust Fly larva changes the flavour of the carrot and makes it quite inedible. Use our floating row cover to keep the adults away from the carrots. Plant after the beginning of June to avoid the first and worst infestation period. The good news for apartment dwellers who want to grow carrots on their balconies is the Carrot Rust Fly is not a good flyer. It is unlikely to infest their high-rise crop.

Wireworm - These are the larva of click beetles. They are about an inch and a half long, slender and reddish brown. When squeezed they turn as rigid as a wire, hence the name. Wireworms chew irregular holes through roots, making the carrots inedible. Wireworms prefer a moist soil so preparing your carrot bed so that it is well drained will help. Interplanting with mustard leaf is an excellent way to discourage wireworm damage. The flavour of the mustard is one deterrent, and mustard also helps to dry out the soil, forcing the wireworm away from the roots.

Predatory nematodes are an effective control for both Carrot Rust Fly and wireworm. Apply generously in the spring when the larva of both pests is most active.

Magnesium, PotassiumFood
188Carrots, Purple HazeApiaceaeDaucus carota (dg fo pf wp)7950 eachDeep purple on the outside, but bright orange inside. The sweet tasting roots gracefully taper to 25cm long. Purple Haze was an AAS winner in 2006 and one of the most nutritious carrot varieties available. Easy and different!Magnesium, Potassium, Vitamin AFood
28Epazote; WormseedChenopodiaceaeChenopodium ambrosioides (dg fo pf wp)Strew seed on surface of sandy soil and keep moist until germination.Plant prefers full sun and does well in waste ground.full sun100 eachPerennial wormwood-like plant is the source of a potent spice and vermifuge. The dried leaf is traditionally mixed in bean dishes, a tasty practice that also allays flatus. In sufficient dosage, and especially if the seeds are taken by themselves, the plant will aid in expulsion of intestinal worms.Calcium, Manganese, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, PotassiumCarminative, Seasoning
82Pumpkin, Styrian Hull-lessCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)2013-06-01 00:00:0018 each starts in outdoor soiltransplantPrepare the hill or the bed with plenty of aged manure or compost, direct-seed the seeds, and choose the three best seedlings from the hill (or if row cropping, thin to 1 plant every 3 feet). Keep weeded and watered. Vines will soon become self-mulching.90full sunrich30 eachThis is a unique pumpkin cultivar developed in the provice of Styria in Austria.

We have been thinking about the challenge of finding ways that people can grow protein-rich foods in temperated gardens with high yield for the effort and without the need for a lot of processing. Our search lead us eventually to the naked seeded pumpkin (so-called hull-less or Styrian pumpkins). These pumpkins have a seed that is encased only in a thin membrane, which may be consumed along with the seed. The seeds can be lightly toasted with a little salt or eaten raw and uncooked.

This is a convenient protein source, a good snack or addition to smoothies or salads, rich in unsaturated fat, an immune tonic and tonic to the reproductive organs of both females and males. Consumption of the seed is a specific for treating benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) as well as prostate cancer.

These pumpkins are all about the seeds -- the flesh itself is low sugar and not particularly tasty. They make good goat food. So back to being after the seeds, which are a great protein source, we obtained some nice open-pollinated seed of this plant and grew a large patch of it this year. The plant turned out to be problem-free, fast-growing and a rewardingly prolific producer of the large fruits.

Harvest and processing: Harvest pumpkins after first frost, split open and scoop out seeds and spaghetti onto a table screen. Using your hands and a garden hose, work the mash and water it down until the seeds are free of spaghetti. Scoop up the seeds and air dry them on screens, stirring several times per day, until the seeds are dry and stable. Store in paper bags.
PotassiumAnthelmintic, Food, Forage, Immunostimulant, Oil, Veterinary
265Rye, FallPoaceaeSecale cereale (dg fo pf wp)Seed: sow March or October in situ and only just cover the seed. Germination should take place within 2 weeks.

An easily grown plant, it succeeds in most soils but prefers a well-drained light soil in a sunny position.

It thrives on infertile, submarginal areas and is renouned for its ability to grow on sandy soils.

Established plants are drought tolerant. The plant is reported to tolerate an annual precipitation in the range of of 22 to 176cm, an annual temperature in the range of of 4.3 to 21.3°C and a pH of 4.5 to 8.2.

Rye is a widely cultivated temperate zone cereal crop. It is able to withstand severe climatic conditions and can be grown much further north and at higher altitudes than wheat.

Average yields vary widely from country to country, the world average is around 1.6 tonnes per hectare with yields of almost 7 tonnes per hectare achieved in Norway.

There are many named varieties. Rye is a rather variable species and botanists have divided it into a number of sub-species, all of which could be of value in breeding programmes. These sub-species are briefly listed below:

S. cereale afghanicum (Vavilov.) K.Hammer. Native to the Caucasus, western Asia and India.

S. cereale ancestrale Zhuk. Native to western Asia.

S. cereale dighoricum Vavilov. Native to the Caucasus and eastern europe.

S. cereale segetale Zhuk. Native to temperate Asia.

Rye grows well with cornflowers and pansies, though it inhibits the growth of poppies and couch grass.
full sunwell drainedpoor25000 gramsEdible seed: cooked. A common cereal, it is used especially in N. Europe to make bread. The seed contains about 13% protein. The grain also contains some gluten, though not as much as wheat, so it makes a heavier bread than wheat. It can also be used to make cakes etc. The seed can be sprouted and added to salads.

Malt, a sweet substance produced by germinating the seed, is extracted from the roasted germinated seed and used as a sweetening agent and in making beer etc. The roasted (ungerminated) seed is used as a coffee substitute.

The straw is used as a fuel or as a biomass in industry. It is quite strong and can also be used in thatching, for paper making, weaving mats and hats etc. Other uses for the straw include as a packing material for nursery stock, bricks and tiles, for bedding, archery targets, and mushroom compost.

The plant is a good green manure crop. It is fast growing with an extensive and deep root system. It is especially useful if sown in late autumn. Its growth over the winter will prevent soil erosion and the leaching of nutrients from the soil, it can then be incorporated into the soil in the spring. The extensive root system also makes this a good plant to use for soil stabilization, especially on sandy soils.
Carbohydrate, Phosphorous, Potassium, ProteinBeverage, Cancer, Fibre, Fuel, Green manure, Laxative, Oil, Poultice, Soil stabilization, Sweetening
216SquashCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)20 eachPotassiumFood
211Squash, AcornCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)14Seed - sow early to mid spring in a greenhouse in a rich soil. Germination should take place within 2 weeks. Sow 2 or 3 seeds per pot and thin out to the best plant. Grow them on fast and plant out after the last expected frosts, giving them cloche or frame protection for at least their first few weeks if you are trying them outdoors.Cultivated Beds;sun or partial shadewell drainedloam80 eachComing from the 2010 harvest.PotassiumAnthelmintic, Food, Veterinary
92Squash, Early ButternutCucurbitaceaeCucurbita moschata (dg fo pf wp)7Direct sow or transplant in late May or early June once the soil is warm. For transplants, start seeds indoors during the first two weeks of May. Make sure plants are in the ground no later than June 15th. Optimal soil temperature: 25-35°C (68-95°F). Seeds should germinate in 7-14 days.

Sow seeds 2cm (1") deep. Sow 3 seeds in each spot where you want a plant to grow, and thin to the strongest plant. Space summer squash 45-60cm (18-24") apart in rows 90-120cm (36-48") apart. Give winter squash and pumpkins even more room with a minimum of 90-120cm (36-48") apart in rows 120-180cm (48-72") apart.

In optimal conditions at least 80% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 2 years. Per 100' row: 180 seeds, per acre: 15M seeds.
110Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. These big plants need lots of food. Use 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer worked into the soil beneath each plant. All squash grow male flowers first, at later female flowers. The female flowers have tiny fruits at the base of their petals and require pollination by bees mostly. Incomplete pollination often happens at the beginning of the season, and results in misshapen fruits that are withered at the flower end. Just discard these damaged fruits before they begin to rot.. You can encourage bees to your garden by growing Phacelia or Buckwheat for improved pollination.full sun5 gramsReplaces Zenith. AAS winner. Medium-sized squash are uniform on productive, semi-bush plants. Each has a small seed cavity in dark orange sweet flesh with a tender, thin skin.

The three species of squash that we offer represent a wide variety of shapes and colours. Each will cross-polliinate readily whithin their species. For instance, all C. pepo will cross-pollinate with each other, but not with C. maxima or C. moschata. For people who want to save their seeds, this is a very important consideration. The fruits themselves will not be affected by cross pollination, but the seeds inside will be, so squash need to be grown in isolation from other members of their species if seed saving is the goal.

Fruit is ripe if your thumbnail doesn't mark the skin and the stem is dry and brown. Cut the stem about 4cm (2") from the fruit. Squash survive a light frost, but store better if harvested before frost.

Storage: Field-cure for 10 days in the sun, or cure indoors in a warm room for 4 or 5 days. To prevent mould sponge the skins with a solution of 10 parts water to 1 part chlorine bleach. Store at 10-15ºC (50-60ºF) with low humidity with good air circulation. Try on a shelf in the garage.

Bacterial wilt (Erwinia tracheiphila) - Remove an destrow infested plants. If striped or spotted cucumber beetles appear, control as early as possible. Powdery mildew - avoid wetting foliage if possible. Water early in the day so that above ground parts of the plants dry as quickly as possible. Avoid crowding plants and eliminate weeds around plants and garden area to improve air circulation. Viral disease - remove and destroy entire infested plant along with immediately surrounding soil and soil clinging to roots.

Carbohydrate, Potassium, Vitamin AFood
88Squash, Pattypans, SunburstCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)7Direct sow or transplant in late May or early June once the soil is warm. For transplants, start seeds indoors during the first two weeks of May. Make sure plants are in the ground no later than June 15th. Optimal soil temperature: 25-35°C (68-95°F). Seeds should germinate in 7-14 days.

Sow seeds 2cm (1") deep. Sow 3 seeds in each spot where you want a plant to grow, and thin to the strongest plant. Space summer squash 45-60cm (18-24") apart in rows 90-120cm (36-48") apart. Give winter squash and pumpkins even more room with a minimum of 90-120cm (36-48") apart in rows 120-180cm (48-72") apart.

In optimal conditions at least 80% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 2 years. Per 100' row: 180 seeds, per acre: 15M seeds.
60Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. These big plants need lots of food. Use 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer worked into the soil beneath each plant. All squash grow male flowers first, at later female flowers. The female flowers have tiny fruits at the base of their petals and require pollination by bees mostly. Incomplete pollination often happens at the beginning of the season, and results in misshapen fruits that are withered at the flower end. Just discard these damaged fruits before they begin to rot. You can encourage bees to your garden by growing Phacelia or Buckwheat for improved pollination.full sunrich2 gramsVivid deep yellow pattypans look like jewels nestling in a big bush. These dazzling miniatures are best picked at 5cm (2"). Steam them whole for a treat.

The three species of squash that we offer represent a wide variety of shapes and colours. Each will cross-polliinate readily whithin their species. For instance, all C. pepo will cross-pollinate with each other, but not with C. maxima or C. moschata. For people who want to save their seeds, this is a very important consideration. The fruits themselves will not be affected by cross pollination, but the seeds inside will be, so squash need to be grown in isolation from other members of their species if seed saving is the goal.

Summer Squash: pick when small, if fruit gets big the plant stops producing. Check the plants regularly!

Winter Squash: Fruit is ripe if your thumbnail doesn't mark the skin and the stem is dry and brown. Cut the stem about 4cm (2") from the fruit. Squash survive a light frost, but store better if harvested before frost.

Storage: Field-cure for 10 days in the sun, or cure indoors in a warm room for 4 or 5 days. To prevent mould sponge the skins with a solution of 10 parts water to 1 part chlorine bleach. Store at 10-15ºC (50-60ºF) with low humidity with good air circulation. Try on a shelf in the garage.

Bacterial wilt (Erwinia tracheiphila) - Remove an destrow infested plants. If striped or spotted cucumber beetles appear, control as early as possible. Powdery mildew - avoid wetting foliage if possible. Water early in the day so that above ground parts of the plants dry as quickly as possible. Avoid crowding plants and eliminate weeds around plants and garden area to improve air circulation. Viral disease - remove and destroy entire infested plant along with immediately surrounding soil and soil clinging to roots.
PotassiumFood
12Squash, Red Kuri; Japanese Red Kuri Squash; Hokkaido Squash; Baby Red Hubbard; Uchiki KuriCucurbitaceaeCucurbita maxima (dg fo pf wp)Standard vegetable culture. Prepare a rich hill and direct seed 5 seeds per hill, then thin to the best 3 seedlings. Allow the plants to sprangle. Give them plenty of room -- they will extend at least 5 feet in every direction, unless you train them to do otherwise, which by the way can be done. Water deeply twice a week.15 eachNative to Mesoamarica and grown worldwide. We found this squash to be gratifyingly vigorous and pest resistant, and it gave more food value per square foot than just about anything else we grew in the garden. The flea beetles did go after the seedlings right when the ground warmed up in the early summer, but we spread some neem seed meal around the plants and on the young leaves and this saved them. I think some of the seedlings would have made it through without treatment, but I was already salivating, so didn't push my luck. The plants doubled in size every day or two. It was amazing to watch them grow. Good compost, I guess (thanks to Kalesh). Each vine bore 3 (more or less) bright globular fruits, and since we saved three plants per hill, that gave 9 squashes per hill, which was a lot. But it was not too many -- we ate them all! This is our favorite squash. We like to split it, scoop out the insides (which is really easy to do, given the shape) and bake the halves in the oven until done. As the squash cooks, it creates its own sugary glaze. We find it unnecessary to augment the natural nuttiness and sweetness with any oily or sugary additive. We like to eat these as they are, but we also like to make them into pumpkin pies. We think they make the best of all pumpkin pies, not only because they are particularly tasty, but because the flesh is dry, meaty, and stringless, and reconstitutes admirably well inside a pie shell. (Too much water in squash used to make pumpkin pies is a real no no.) We found that our's were harvestable before frost and didn't need to be stored to develop sugar. But the standard method with squash is to harvest after the first light frost, wash with cold water and sun dry, then put into cool, dry storage. Another option is to go into a baking frenzy and bake the fruits and then smash the clean flesh into freezer containers and freeze for later use. We like to freeze them in 3 cup baggies, just enough to make 2 pumpkin pies, or augment a winter dinner.PotassiumFood, Veterinary
212Squash, SpaghettiCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)14Seed - sow early to mid spring in a greenhouse in a rich soil. Germination should take place within 2 weeks. Sow 2 or 3 seeds per pot and thin out to the best plant. Grow them on fast and plant out after the last expected frosts, giving them cloche or frame protection for at least their first few weeks if you are trying them outdoors.Cultivated Beds;sun or partial shademoist16 eachFrom harvest 2010PotassiumAnthelmintic, Food, Veterinary
215Squash, Winter, small striped delicataCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)14Seed - sow early to mid spring in a greenhouse in a rich soil. Germination should take place within 2 weeks. Sow 2 or 3 seeds per pot and thin out to the best plant. Grow them on fast and plant out after the last expected frosts, giving them cloche or frame protection for at least their first few weeks if you are trying them outdoors.Cultivated Beds;sun or partial shademoist135 eachPotassiumFood

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Agavaceae, Aizoaceae, Alliaceae, Amaranthaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Araliaceae, Asteraceae, Boraginaceae, Brassicaceae, Campanulaceae, Caprifoliaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Crassulaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Elaeagnaceae, Ephedraceae, Ericaceae, Fabaceae, Fagaceae, Hamamelidaceae, Hyacinthaceae, Hypericaceae, Lamiaceae, Lythraceae, Malvaceae, Myricaceae, Onagraceae, Papaveraceae, Poaceae, Polygonaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, Rubiaceae, Saururaceae, Schisandraceae, Scrophulariaceae, Solanaceae, Tropaeolaceae, Valerianaceae, Verbenaceae, Vitaceae
have a specific use
Adaptogen, Alterative, Analgesic, Anaphrodisiac, Anodyne, Anthelmintic, Antibacterial, Anticholesterolemic, Antidepressant, Antidermatosic, Antidote, Antiecchymotic, Antiemetic, Antifungal, Antiinflammatory, Antiperiodic, Antiphlogistic, Antipruritic, Antipyretic, Antirheumatic, Antiscorbutic, Antiscrophulatic, Antiseptic, Antispasmodic, Antitumor, Antitussive, Aperient, Aphrodisiac, Appetizer, Aromatherapy, Astringent, Basketry, Beads, Beverage, Bitter, Bronchiodilator, Cancer, Cardiac, Cardiotonic, Carminative, Cathartic, Charcoal, Cholagogue, Compost, Contraceptive, Cosmetic, Curdling agent, Demulcent, Deobstruent, Depurative, Detergent, Diaphoretic, Digestive, Diuretic, Dye, Emetic, Emmenagogue, Emollient, Essential, Expectorant, Febrifuge, Fibre, Flavouring, Food, Forage, Fragrance, Fuel, Fungicide, Galactogogue, Green manure, Haemostatic, Hedge, Hepatic, Homeopathy, Hypnotic, Hypoglycaemic, Hypotensive, Immunostimulant, Infertility, Insect Repellant, Insectiary, Insecticide, Kidney, Latex, Laxative, Lithontripic, Litmus, Mordant, Mouthwash, Mulch, Narcotic, Nervine, Nutritive, Oil, Oneirogen, Ophthalmic, Ornamental, Parasiticide, Pectoral, Pioneer, Pipes, Pollution, Poultice, Purgative, Refrigerant, Restorative, Rubefacient, Sacrificial, Salve, Seasoning, Sedative, Shelterbelt, Sialagogue, Skin, Soil stabilization, Sternutatory, Stimulant, Stings, Stomachic, Strewing, Stuffing, Sweetening, Tannin, TB, Tonic, Uterine tonic, Vasodilator, Vermifuge, Veterinary, Vulnerary, Warts, Waterproofing, Wood
are sensitive to a particular nutrient
Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Zinc
supplies a particular nutrient (dynamic accumulator)
Antioxidants, Boron, Calcium, Carbohydrate, Chromium, Copper, Fat, Fat: Omega-3, Fibre: Non-Soluble, Folate, Iodine, Iron, Lycopene, Magnesium, Manganese, Niacin, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Potassium, Protein, Silica, Sulfur, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Zinc

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