Plant supplies/Carbohydrate

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Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for plants that supply Carbohydrate:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
103Amaranth, Golden GiantAmaranthaceaeAmaranthus hypochondriacus (dg fo pf wp)Direct seed in the spring garden and thin to about 1 foot apart. We tested the yield of our (Horizon Herbs Select) cultivar and registered one pound of finished seed per 10 row feet (about 10 plants). Seed - sow late spring in situ. An earlier sowing can be made in a greenhouse and the plants put out after the last expected frosts. Germination is usually rapid and good if the soil is warm. A drop in temperature overnight aids germination. Cuttings of growing plants root easily.100Plant prefers full sun and regular garden soil. If you can grow pigweed in your garden, then you can grow this amaranth (they are related).

This is one of the easiest grains for home gardeners to grow and eat. At this point we may be looking at an interesting diversion from our standard diet -- in a few years we may be relying on it heavily. At my house we already rely on it heavily. It is time to walk the garden, and make Captain Crunch walk the plank!

Requires a hot sheltered position if it is to do well. Tolerates a pH in the range 5.2 to 7.5. Plants should not be given inorganic fertilizers, see notes above on toxicity. Often cultivated, especially in tropical areas, for its edible leaves and seeds, there are many named varieties. This is the most robust and highest yielding of the grain amaranths, though it is late maturing and therefore less suitable for northern areas.

Most if not all members of this genus photosynthesize by a more efficient method than most plants. Called the 'C4 carbon-fixation pathway', this process is particularly efficient at high temperatures, in bright sunlight and under dry conditions.
full sungarden200 eachAnnual native to South America. This is one of the earliest of all crops. As a young archaeologist, I excavated charred Amaranth seeds at the Koster site dating back to the new world paleolithic. This plant is still easy and worthwhile to grow and makes huge plumes of golden flowers on plants to 8 feet tall. Golden Amaranth produces the superior type of seed for food use -- light colored, loaded with nutrients, incomparably tasty.

Harvest: Wait until the seed is completely mature in the seedhead -- rub the head between your hands and if mature seed falls out, then its done. If not, then let it mature some more -- it won't hurt a thing! Harvest in the afternoon of a bright and sunny day (see harvest pictures, attached). Lay the seedheads out in the sun on tarps to dry, turning regularly and covering to disallow morning dew. Or, lay the seedheads out on racks in the dry shade or in an unused solar greenhouse. Once thoroughly dry, beat the heads with flails made of green willow or rub the heads through a 1/2 inch hardware cloth. Then, wind winnow on a sheet, allowing the chaff to blow away, and keeping the grain behind. If you have seed cleaning screens then the job will be easier and faster. Once the seed is clean, store it in jars in the kitchen.

It will last many years (if you don't eat it faster than that, that is.) I use 1/2 cup per person for breakfast, simmered in five times as much water. In other words, a standard breakfast for 2 people would be one cup of grain to 5 cups of water. Bring rapidly to a boil, then set to low and simmer for about 30 minutes, until the water is absorbed by the grain and the cooking gruel reaches the "pukka-pukka" stage where the bubbles burst out of the thickened gruel with a popping sound. Then, turn off the heat and cover for about 10 minutes. Then eat naked, or embellished by milks, raisins or other dried fruits.

P.S. If you make this your breakfast cereal you will find that, after a couple of days, your (ahem) stool becomes very large and well formed. This is reason for rejoicing, not only because it feels great on expulsion, but because toxins are being moved out of your system, and as a cosequence you will probably not suffer from colon cancer.
Carbohydrate, ProteinAstringent, Dye, Food
86Beans, Pole, Blue LakeFabaceaePhaseolus vulgaris (dg fo pf wp)8Direct sow from mid-May to the beginning of July. Try to plant during a warm, dry spell. Soil must be warm - if it is not warm enough, seeds will rot, especially our untreated seeds. Optimal soil temperature: 21-32°C (70-90°F).

Seeds can be started indoors, or sowed directly. Set seeds 7-10cm (3-4") apart and 3.5cm (1½") deep at the base of a support. Plants will climb by twining around almost anything. Try rough poles, lumber, re-bar, or build a strong trellis 2-2.5m (6-8') tall. Seeds will sprout in 8-16 days, depending on soil conditions.


In optimal conditions a tleast 75% of seeds should germinate. Usual seed life: 3 years. Per 100' row: 400 seeds. Per acre: 43.5M seeds.
65Ideal pH: 6.0-6.5. Well drained, warm soil in full sun is best. Use 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer for every wm (10') of row. Too much nitrogen fertilizer is often the cause of poor pod set and delayed maturity. If beans flower but do not set pods, the cause can be zinc deficiency. Try spraying the plants with kelp based fertilizer. Wet leaves on crowded plants are subject to diseases. Thin plants to increase air circulation and avoid touching the leaves while they are wet. Because pole beans are always climbing, there are always beans at different stages of maturity. It is important to keep picking regularly so the plant does not fully mature seeds and stop producing new pods. If pods get fat with seed, the plant will stop flowering. The smaller the bean, the more tender they are.50 gramsBlue Lake beans are straight, stringless and unusually smooth, with a stronger flavour than the bush variety. Its large numbers of dark green pods are round, tender and meaty, and 15-18cm (6-7") long. Seeds are white and plants are long bearing.

Many people feel that pole beans have a richer bean flavour than bush beans. The effort of trellising them is more than repaid by the ease of picking and their extended, abundant harvest. Pole beans are a good choice for small gardens because they use vertical space.

If beans flower but do not set pods, the cause can be a zinc deficiency. Try spraying the plants with Kelpman. Wet leaves on crowded plants are subject to diseases. Thin plants to increase air circulation and try not to touch the plants while they are wet.
Carbohydrate, Nitrogen, ProteinZincFood
193Corn, Heirloom, white open pollinatedPoaceaeZea mays (dg fo pf wp)40 eachCarbohydrateFood
191Corn, Peaches and CreamPoaceaeZea mays (dg fo pf wp)40 eachCarbohydrateFood
192Corn, Pink PopcornPoaceaeZea mays (dg fo pf wp)48575 eachEarly maturing popcorn on 1.5m tall plants with two ears each. Produces fluffy white, flavourful popcorn from attractive mauve kernel.CarbohydrateFood
49Maca, Red; Maca RojoBrassicaceaeLepidium peruvianum (dg fo pf wp)6Sow the seed on the surface of the seed bed, stir it around with your fingers, then tamp in securely. Thin to 6 inch spacing, and harvest after the first year of growth. For most localities, best to direct-seed in September and harvest in May or so, but if your winters are very snowy I don't think this will probably work. In the case of snowy winters (zone 6 and under) I would plant this as a quick fall or spring crop and harvest small roots. We planted MACA for three years before we worked out a reasonable scenario and took in our first good roots, then a seed crop. Also, anything of this nature depends on the weather patterns of the year in question. As always, we encourage experimentation and the feedback we're getting is encouraging -- positive reports have been received from New Jersey, Santa Cruz and North Dakota. As my teacher always said, "Keep trying."The plant is very tolerant of high intensity sunlight and withstands drastic temperature fluctuations. Plant prefers fall, winter and spring conditions for growth. Full sun and a fast-draining soil is preferred. Maca likes a somewhat alkaline soil, such as decomposed granite or volcanic soils. However, lacking this kind of soil, regular garden soil will do. Composted manures are a good fertilizer for MACA. I don't think the plant will overwinter in less than zone 6, unless perhaps in very dry sites or protected alpine locations. Here in Williams we get very little snow, and the plant grows through the winter, which is preferred, as it gives the plants time to mature, and encourages bulbing (the hypocotyl). If left in the field for 2 years, the root will become quite woody and the plant will go to seed. Probably the best regions for growing maca are high steppes in tropical or subtropical countries, although it is worthwhile to try planting almost anywhere because very little is known about the potential adaptability. All plantings will be experimental until reasonable methodology and timing are worked out.full sunwell drainedgarden100 eachBiennial, radish-like, rosette forming plant native to the high Peruvian Puna. This is a high elevation cultivar that is considered to be medicinally superior to other strains.

The first photo is of a seedling that was direct-seeded outdoors. The new seed is extremely viable and vigorous, giving over 90% germination in 6 days.

Second photo shows the red-purple coloration of the root, which is still at the stage prior to formation of bulbous hypocotyl.
Calcium, Carbohydrate, Iodine, Iron, ProteinAdaptogen, Aphrodisiac, Cancer, Food, Infertility, Nutritive, Tonic
98PotatoSolanaceaeSolanum tuberosum (dg fo pf wp)Potatoes are tolerant of cool soils and moderate frosts. Minimum soil temperature at planting time should be 6°C (43°F). Plants will emerge about 2-3 weeks after planting. Set tubers approximately 7-10cm (3-4") deep, and 30cm (12") apart in prepared trenches spaced 60cm (24") apart.Ideal pH: 5.5-6.5. Well-drained, loamy soil rich in organic matter is preferred, but potatoes are not overly fussy. If heavy clay or clay/loam soils are used, double-digging and improving organic matter content by growing cover crops or adding compost or manure can correct drainage problems. Do not lime areas planned for potatoes. When the above-ground portion of the plant is 30cm (12") tall, "hill up" soil 15cm (6") around the plants. It's okay to cover green leaves. Straw or grass mulch also works well. This process can be repeated up two or three times. It is recommended that no irrigation take place between planting and sprout emergence in order to avoid disease. It is important, though, not to let the soil become too dry, and to irrigate while plants are flowering.full sunwell drainedrich500 gramsWest Coast Seeds mixed assortment. Perfect for the small garden - or even the patio potato grower - and new for 2010, our 500g Mixed Assortment of CERTIFIED ORGANIC seed potatoes offers several different varieties in one convenient package. Seed potatoes produce approximately ten times their own weight for each one planted. This Mixed Assortment includes Sieglinde, Chieftan, Yukon Gold, Russian Blue, and Russian Banana Fingerlings. This assortment is subject to availability.

Potatoes are important to the self-sufficient gardener and the gourmet gardener. Easy to grow, highly nutritious and there is a variety for every use in the kitchen. Some are for baking, some are for salads, some for French fries. You should try them all!

"New" potatoes can be harvested about 7-8 weeks after planting. Potatoes grown for late summer and fall "fresh" use can be dug when tubers are full size or when foliage begins to die. For potatoes grown for storage and winter use, harvest should take place after vines have died back, alternatively, the plants may have to be cut or mown. After killing and removing the plants, tubers should stay in the ground for another 2 weeks to allow firming of their skins for storage. Optimum storage conditions are a dark location 4-7º C (40-45ºF) and 90% relative humidity. Paper sacks stored in a garage will suffice. Check them often though to remove any that are starting to go soft.

Late blight (Phytopthera infestans) is problematic, especially on the Coast. Symptoms appear as water-soaked gray spots on tips and margins of leaves, leaf axils, and on stems. Even if nothing shows on the leaves, late blight makes black spots under the skin of the tuber. Left unchecked, it will destroy the plant. Copper spray is effective if applied regularly through the growing season, including drenching the soil. The most important step to avoiding disease is to establish a vigorous and healthy crop; this can be accomplished by using disease free seed, planting in rich soil, avoiding pre-emergence irrigation and watering carefully once the crop emerges.

The most common pests to bother your potatoes on the coast are wireworms (especially in gardens recently taken out of grass).

Wireworms are the larvae form of a very slender black beetle known as the Click Beetle because if you turn one over, when it goes to right itself, it makes a "Click!" sound. The beetle lays its eggs in grass, and the larvae eat in our gardens. They burrow into the roots, seeds, and underground stems of tomatoes, corn, potatoes, peppers, and squash. The damage is worse on land that has been recently been converted from lawn to garden. The larvae themselves are crisp, golden, up to 1cm long and can live for up to 7 years in the soil.

If your seeds don't appear to sprout, or the plants wilt and die suddenly, your soil may have wireworms. An irregular pattern of plants dying in a field is typical of wireworm damage. To find out if you have wireworms before you start planting, create bait made of carrot and potato pieces. Bury the bait in 10cm of soil, and mark it with a stick. Dig it up in 3 or 4 days. If there are more than 1 or 2 wireworms per bait, you have a problem. They are difficult to control but regular cultivation of the top 10cm of the soil, as well as trapping them on pieces of potato, and crop rotation will slow the damage. Digging in an overwintered Cole crop can also be effective. Predatory nematodes work also.
CarbohydrateFood
265Rye, FallPoaceaeSecale cereale (dg fo pf wp)Seed: sow March or October in situ and only just cover the seed. Germination should take place within 2 weeks.

An easily grown plant, it succeeds in most soils but prefers a well-drained light soil in a sunny position.

It thrives on infertile, submarginal areas and is renouned for its ability to grow on sandy soils.

Established plants are drought tolerant. The plant is reported to tolerate an annual precipitation in the range of of 22 to 176cm, an annual temperature in the range of of 4.3 to 21.3°C and a pH of 4.5 to 8.2.

Rye is a widely cultivated temperate zone cereal crop. It is able to withstand severe climatic conditions and can be grown much further north and at higher altitudes than wheat.

Average yields vary widely from country to country, the world average is around 1.6 tonnes per hectare with yields of almost 7 tonnes per hectare achieved in Norway.

There are many named varieties. Rye is a rather variable species and botanists have divided it into a number of sub-species, all of which could be of value in breeding programmes. These sub-species are briefly listed below:

S. cereale afghanicum (Vavilov.) K.Hammer. Native to the Caucasus, western Asia and India.

S. cereale ancestrale Zhuk. Native to western Asia.

S. cereale dighoricum Vavilov. Native to the Caucasus and eastern europe.

S. cereale segetale Zhuk. Native to temperate Asia.

Rye grows well with cornflowers and pansies, though it inhibits the growth of poppies and couch grass.
full sunwell drainedpoor25000 gramsEdible seed: cooked. A common cereal, it is used especially in N. Europe to make bread. The seed contains about 13% protein. The grain also contains some gluten, though not as much as wheat, so it makes a heavier bread than wheat. It can also be used to make cakes etc. The seed can be sprouted and added to salads.

Malt, a sweet substance produced by germinating the seed, is extracted from the roasted germinated seed and used as a sweetening agent and in making beer etc. The roasted (ungerminated) seed is used as a coffee substitute.

The straw is used as a fuel or as a biomass in industry. It is quite strong and can also be used in thatching, for paper making, weaving mats and hats etc. Other uses for the straw include as a packing material for nursery stock, bricks and tiles, for bedding, archery targets, and mushroom compost.

The plant is a good green manure crop. It is fast growing with an extensive and deep root system. It is especially useful if sown in late autumn. Its growth over the winter will prevent soil erosion and the leaching of nutrients from the soil, it can then be incorporated into the soil in the spring. The extensive root system also makes this a good plant to use for soil stabilization, especially on sandy soils.
Carbohydrate, Phosphorous, Potassium, ProteinBeverage, Cancer, Fibre, Fuel, Green manure, Laxative, Oil, Poultice, Soil stabilization, Sweetening
92Squash, Early ButternutCucurbitaceaeCucurbita moschata (dg fo pf wp)7Direct sow or transplant in late May or early June once the soil is warm. For transplants, start seeds indoors during the first two weeks of May. Make sure plants are in the ground no later than June 15th. Optimal soil temperature: 25-35°C (68-95°F). Seeds should germinate in 7-14 days.

Sow seeds 2cm (1") deep. Sow 3 seeds in each spot where you want a plant to grow, and thin to the strongest plant. Space summer squash 45-60cm (18-24") apart in rows 90-120cm (36-48") apart. Give winter squash and pumpkins even more room with a minimum of 90-120cm (36-48") apart in rows 120-180cm (48-72") apart.

In optimal conditions at least 80% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 2 years. Per 100' row: 180 seeds, per acre: 15M seeds.
110Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. These big plants need lots of food. Use 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer worked into the soil beneath each plant. All squash grow male flowers first, at later female flowers. The female flowers have tiny fruits at the base of their petals and require pollination by bees mostly. Incomplete pollination often happens at the beginning of the season, and results in misshapen fruits that are withered at the flower end. Just discard these damaged fruits before they begin to rot.. You can encourage bees to your garden by growing Phacelia or Buckwheat for improved pollination.full sun5 gramsReplaces Zenith. AAS winner. Medium-sized squash are uniform on productive, semi-bush plants. Each has a small seed cavity in dark orange sweet flesh with a tender, thin skin.

The three species of squash that we offer represent a wide variety of shapes and colours. Each will cross-polliinate readily whithin their species. For instance, all C. pepo will cross-pollinate with each other, but not with C. maxima or C. moschata. For people who want to save their seeds, this is a very important consideration. The fruits themselves will not be affected by cross pollination, but the seeds inside will be, so squash need to be grown in isolation from other members of their species if seed saving is the goal.

Fruit is ripe if your thumbnail doesn't mark the skin and the stem is dry and brown. Cut the stem about 4cm (2") from the fruit. Squash survive a light frost, but store better if harvested before frost.

Storage: Field-cure for 10 days in the sun, or cure indoors in a warm room for 4 or 5 days. To prevent mould sponge the skins with a solution of 10 parts water to 1 part chlorine bleach. Store at 10-15ºC (50-60ºF) with low humidity with good air circulation. Try on a shelf in the garage.

Bacterial wilt (Erwinia tracheiphila) - Remove an destrow infested plants. If striped or spotted cucumber beetles appear, control as early as possible. Powdery mildew - avoid wetting foliage if possible. Water early in the day so that above ground parts of the plants dry as quickly as possible. Avoid crowding plants and eliminate weeds around plants and garden area to improve air circulation. Viral disease - remove and destroy entire infested plant along with immediately surrounding soil and soil clinging to roots.

Carbohydrate, Potassium, Vitamin AFood
97Turnip, Purple Top White GlobeBrassicaceaeBrassica rapa (dg fo pf wp)3Direct sow in March and April and again August to the beginning of October (weather permitting). Optimal soil temperature for germination: 18-21°C (66-70°F). Seeds should sprout in 7-14 days.

Sow 5mm-1cm (¼-½") deep in rows spaced 45-60cm (18-24") apart, and thin to 10-15cm (4-6") apart in the row.

At least 80% of seeds will germinate in optimal conditions. Usual seed life: 4 years. Per 100' row: 300 seeds, per acre: 87M seeds.
55Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. Humus-rich, deeply cultivated soil is key. Add plenty of well rotted compost or manure to th ebeds and cultivate to a depth of 20cm (8"). Dig in 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer for every 3m (10') of row. The real secret to success with turnips is speed. Sow short rows every 2-3 weeks, thin them quickly, keep them watered, harvest, and then sow some more.full sunmoistrich10 gramsCERTIFIED ORGANIC! Roots are smooth and nearly round. Bright purple on top and creamy white in the lower portion. They are mild flavoured and sweet. Can reach 13cm (5") in diameter but are better for eating when picked at 5-8cm (2-3").

Summer turnips are great for salads, pickles, and stir-fries. Any place that you would use spinach or Swiss chard, you can give turnip greens a try.

Gather greens and roots from June to October. Immature seed pods are also tasty.

Remember that turnips are members of the Brassica family, so they should not be planted where other Brassicas have been grown in the past 4 years. This simple crop rotation will prevent nearly all diseases from occurring in the first place. Floating row cover will protect plants from cabbage moth and flea beetles.

CarbohydrateFood, Forage, Sacrificial
356Yam, Cinnamon or Chinese, Shan Yao, Huai ShanDiscorea batatas (dg fo pf wp)1095Woodland garden sunny edges, cultivated beds.sun or partial shadewell drainedclayCarbohydrate, Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin CAnthelmintic, Antidote, Contraceptive, Digestive, Food

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are sensitive to a particular nutrient
Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Zinc
supplies a particular nutrient (dynamic accumulator)
Antioxidants, Boron, Calcium, Carbohydrate, Chromium, Copper, Fat, Fat: Omega-3, Fibre: Non-Soluble, Folate, Iodine, Iron, Lycopene, Magnesium, Manganese, Niacin, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Potassium, Protein, Silica, Sulfur, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Zinc

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