Cucurbitaceae

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Cucurbitaceae
Gourde family

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Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for Cucurbitaceae:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
268Cantaloupe, DeliciousCucurbitaceae10Start seeds indoors 4-5 weeks before last frost. Or sow 5-6 seeds on hills spread 1.5m apart after frost danger is past and soil is warm.105full sunwell drainedsandy35 each
269Cantaloupe, Tasty Bites F1Cucurbitaceae10Start seeds indoors 4-5 weeks before last frost. Or sow 5-6 seeds on hills spread 1.5m apart after frost danger is past and soil is warm.105full sunwell drainedsandy20 each
317Cucumber, ArmenianCucurbitaceaeCucumis sativus (dg fo pf wp)2013-03-15 00:00:0040 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant6Planting: sow indoors 3-4 weeks prior to last frost or direct seed after all risk of frost. For indoor plantings use 2 inches square pots. Plant seeds 0.5-1 inch deep, transplant or space plants 6 inches apart in row. Plants are tender, so soil should be warm 65-75 degrees germination to begin. If growing on a trellis, space plants 18 inches apart.full sunmoistPlanting: sow indoors 3-4 weeks prior to last frost or direct seed after all risk of frost. For indoor plantings use 2 inches square pots. Plant seeds 0.5,1 inch deep, transplant or space plants 6 inches apart in row. Plants are tender, so soil should be warm 65-75 degrees germination to begin. If growing on a trellis, space plants 18 inches apart.
194Cucumber, MarketmoreCucurbitaceaeCucumis sativus (dg fo pf wp)2013-06-18 00:00:00121 each starts in greenhouse soiltransplant8Planting: sow indoors 3-4 weeks prior to last frost or direct seed after all risk of frost. For indoor plantings use 2 inches square pots. Plant seeds 0.5-1 inch deep, transplant or space plants 6 inches apart in row. Plants are tender, so soil should be warm 65-75 degrees germination to begin. If growing on a trellis, space plants 18 inches apart.55full sunmoist310 each(Territorial Seed Company) A great slicing cucumber, and one of the most disease-resistant. Bitter-free and burp less. Vines up to 6' long. This northern cultivar bears loads of 9"-11" straight, white spined cukes.Food
349Cucumber, Mexican Sour GherkinCucurbitaceaeMelothria scabra (dg fo pf wp)8Planting: sow indoors 3-4 weeks prior to last frost or direct seed after all risk of frost. For indoor plantings use 2 inches square pots. Plant seeds 0.5-1 inch deep, transplant or space plants 6 inches apart in row. Plants are tender, so soil should be warm 65-75 degrees germination to begin. If growing on a trellis, space plants 18 inches apart.75full sunmoist(Territorial Seed Company) These little heirlooms pack a powerful, sweet, cucumber flavour with a tangy, citrus twist. Pretty enough to grow trellised among flowers or in a hanging basket. One inch curettes look like doll-sized watermelons!
348Cucumber, Miniature WhiteCucurbitaceaeCucumis sativus (dg fo pf wp)8Planting: sow indoors 3-4 weeks prior to last frost or direct seed after all risk of frost. For indoor plantings use 2 inches square pots. Plant seeds 0.5-1 inch deep, transplant or space plants 6 inches apart in row. Plants are tender, so soil should be warm 65-75 degrees germination to begin. If growing on a trellis, space plants 18 inches apart.50full sunmoist(Territorial Seed Company) Perfect at 3" long, these lightly spined white fruit offer a bitter-free snap, are superb unskilled in salads, and make wonderful pickles. Slightly compact habit maker it great for small spaces or containers.
350Cucumber, Telegraph ImprovedCucurbitaceaeCucumis sativus (dg fo pf wp)8Planting: sow indoors 3-4 weeks prior to last frost or direct seed after all risk of frost. For indoor plantings use 2 inches square pots. Plant seeds 0.5-1 inch deep, transplant or space plants 6 inches apart in row. Plants are tender, so soil should be warm 65-75 degrees germination to begin. If growing on a trellis, space plants 18 inches apart.60full sunmoist(Territorial Seed Company) Dark green, sleek, 10"-14" fruit are burp less, mild flavoured, and never bitter. Grow up to 8' in greenhouse, easily trellised, set fruit without pollination. Does well outdoors, too.
39Jiao-gu-lanCucurbitaceaeGynostemma pentaphyllum (dg fo pf wp)21Seeds germinate in 3 to 6 weeks in warm soil.Plant prefers part shade, well-drained and nitrogen rich soil, and is hardy to 20 degrees F. Makes an excellent indoor plant. Does well in pots.partial shadewell drained25 eachHardiness:Hardier than previously reported--at least down to 20 degrees f. Does go winter dormant.

Herbaceous perennial vine native to China and Japan.

The dried leaves of this plant make a tasty, energy-filled tea that contains 4 times more ginseng-like saponins than Asian or American ginseng.
NitrogenAdaptogen
291Luffa; Loofa; Lufa; Sponge GourdCucurbitaceaeLuffa aegyptiaca (dg fo pf wp)7Plant indoors 3-4 weeks befor last frost. Do not pull plants apart; transplant entire clump. Will not germinate in cool soil.well drainedloam0 each
235Melon, EarlichampCucurbitaceaeCitrullus lanatus (dg fo pf wp)510 eachFood
271Melon, French Charentais Savor F1CucurbitaceaeCitrullus lanatus (dg fo pf wp)7Sow indoors 3 weeks before last frost date in gallon pots and transplant. Or, seed directly in the garden once the soil has truly warmed up. Plant 1/2 inch deep and tamp securely. Germ in one week. Thin or transplant to 3 plants per hill, and space hills at least 6 feet apart. Watermelon require plenty of room to grow!78full sunwell drainedrich20 eachAnnual vine bearing large oblong fruits ranging in weight from 10 to 30 lbs, sometimes more. Watermelon prefers rich, sandy soil and does best in the full sun. When preparing pots for starting our's, I mixed 50% pure compost with 50% sand, and when I thinned the seedlings, noticed a vigorous branching root system after a little more than a week. A good sign. When transplanting the seeds, they tended to stick to my fingers, also a good sign, because they are covered with residual sugar, a sweet memory of last year's crop. Moon and stars is an heirloom classic -- large fruited, with very sweet red flesh and an outer skin that is dark green with yellow markings that resemble the moon and the stars shining out from the dark firmament. I don't know about you, but I don't trust a watermelon that doesn't make seeds. I like to be able to collect seeds and replant them year after year. I like to engage in watermelion seed spitting contests, which I swear I once won, if only we could've found the seed. I like red fleshed watermelons best of all. I've tried all the different kinds, and I think moon and stars are the best. We direct seeded our's second week of June and we were eating watermelons by Labor day, and still eating watermelons on Oct 1. My friend Charlie in Bath Co. Kentucky planted the same lot of seeds and he got 30 lb fruits, bigger than what we accomplished here in the mountains of Southern Oregon. So judging by this I'd say this watermelon works in a wide range of climates. We offer a big packet for a small price.
272Melon, Specialty Serenade F1CucurbitaceaeCitrullus lanatus (dg fo pf wp)7Sow indoors 3 weeks before last frost date in gallon pots and transplant. Or, seed directly in the garden once the soil has truly warmed up. Plant 1/2 inch deep and tamp securely. Germ in one week. Thin or transplant to 3 plants per hill, and space hills at least 6 feet apart. Watermelon require plenty of room to grow!78full sunwell drainedrich20 eachAnnual vine bearing large oblong fruits ranging in weight from 10 to 30 lbs, sometimes more. Watermelon prefers rich, sandy soil and does best in the full sun. When preparing pots for starting our's, I mixed 50% pure compost with 50% sand, and when I thinned the seedlings, noticed a vigorous branching root system after a little more than a week. A good sign. When transplanting the seeds, they tended to stick to my fingers, also a good sign, because they are covered with residual sugar, a sweet memory of last year's crop. Moon and stars is an heirloom classic -- large fruited, with very sweet red flesh and an outer skin that is dark green with yellow markings that resemble the moon and the stars shining out from the dark firmament. I don't know about you, but I don't trust a watermelon that doesn't make seeds. I like to be able to collect seeds and replant them year after year. I like to engage in watermelion seed spitting contests, which I swear I once won, if only we could've found the seed. I like red fleshed watermelons best of all. I've tried all the different kinds, and I think moon and stars are the best. We direct seeded our's second week of June and we were eating watermelons by Labor day, and still eating watermelons on Oct 1. My friend Charlie in Bath Co. Kentucky planted the same lot of seeds and he got 30 lb fruits, bigger than what we accomplished here in the mountains of Southern Oregon. So judging by this I'd say this watermelon works in a wide range of climates. We offer a big packet for a small price.
82Pumpkin, Styrian Hull-lessCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)2013-06-01 00:00:0018 each starts in outdoor soiltransplantPrepare the hill or the bed with plenty of aged manure or compost, direct-seed the seeds, and choose the three best seedlings from the hill (or if row cropping, thin to 1 plant every 3 feet). Keep weeded and watered. Vines will soon become self-mulching.90full sunrich30 eachThis is a unique pumpkin cultivar developed in the provice of Styria in Austria.

We have been thinking about the challenge of finding ways that people can grow protein-rich foods in temperated gardens with high yield for the effort and without the need for a lot of processing. Our search lead us eventually to the naked seeded pumpkin (so-called hull-less or Styrian pumpkins). These pumpkins have a seed that is encased only in a thin membrane, which may be consumed along with the seed. The seeds can be lightly toasted with a little salt or eaten raw and uncooked.

This is a convenient protein source, a good snack or addition to smoothies or salads, rich in unsaturated fat, an immune tonic and tonic to the reproductive organs of both females and males. Consumption of the seed is a specific for treating benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) as well as prostate cancer.

These pumpkins are all about the seeds -- the flesh itself is low sugar and not particularly tasty. They make good goat food. So back to being after the seeds, which are a great protein source, we obtained some nice open-pollinated seed of this plant and grew a large patch of it this year. The plant turned out to be problem-free, fast-growing and a rewardingly prolific producer of the large fruits.

Harvest and processing: Harvest pumpkins after first frost, split open and scoop out seeds and spaghetti onto a table screen. Using your hands and a garden hose, work the mash and water it down until the seeds are free of spaghetti. Scoop up the seeds and air dry them on screens, stirring several times per day, until the seeds are dry and stable. Store in paper bags.
PotassiumAnthelmintic, Food, Forage, Immunostimulant, Oil, Veterinary
216SquashCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)20 eachPotassiumFood
211Squash, AcornCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)14Seed - sow early to mid spring in a greenhouse in a rich soil. Germination should take place within 2 weeks. Sow 2 or 3 seeds per pot and thin out to the best plant. Grow them on fast and plant out after the last expected frosts, giving them cloche or frame protection for at least their first few weeks if you are trying them outdoors.Cultivated Beds;sun or partial shadewell drainedloam80 eachComing from the 2010 harvest.PotassiumAnthelmintic, Food, Veterinary
92Squash, Early ButternutCucurbitaceaeCucurbita moschata (dg fo pf wp)7Direct sow or transplant in late May or early June once the soil is warm. For transplants, start seeds indoors during the first two weeks of May. Make sure plants are in the ground no later than June 15th. Optimal soil temperature: 25-35°C (68-95°F). Seeds should germinate in 7-14 days.

Sow seeds 2cm (1") deep. Sow 3 seeds in each spot where you want a plant to grow, and thin to the strongest plant. Space summer squash 45-60cm (18-24") apart in rows 90-120cm (36-48") apart. Give winter squash and pumpkins even more room with a minimum of 90-120cm (36-48") apart in rows 120-180cm (48-72") apart.

In optimal conditions at least 80% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 2 years. Per 100' row: 180 seeds, per acre: 15M seeds.
110Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. These big plants need lots of food. Use 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer worked into the soil beneath each plant. All squash grow male flowers first, at later female flowers. The female flowers have tiny fruits at the base of their petals and require pollination by bees mostly. Incomplete pollination often happens at the beginning of the season, and results in misshapen fruits that are withered at the flower end. Just discard these damaged fruits before they begin to rot.. You can encourage bees to your garden by growing Phacelia or Buckwheat for improved pollination.full sun5 gramsReplaces Zenith. AAS winner. Medium-sized squash are uniform on productive, semi-bush plants. Each has a small seed cavity in dark orange sweet flesh with a tender, thin skin.

The three species of squash that we offer represent a wide variety of shapes and colours. Each will cross-polliinate readily whithin their species. For instance, all C. pepo will cross-pollinate with each other, but not with C. maxima or C. moschata. For people who want to save their seeds, this is a very important consideration. The fruits themselves will not be affected by cross pollination, but the seeds inside will be, so squash need to be grown in isolation from other members of their species if seed saving is the goal.

Fruit is ripe if your thumbnail doesn't mark the skin and the stem is dry and brown. Cut the stem about 4cm (2") from the fruit. Squash survive a light frost, but store better if harvested before frost.

Storage: Field-cure for 10 days in the sun, or cure indoors in a warm room for 4 or 5 days. To prevent mould sponge the skins with a solution of 10 parts water to 1 part chlorine bleach. Store at 10-15ºC (50-60ºF) with low humidity with good air circulation. Try on a shelf in the garage.

Bacterial wilt (Erwinia tracheiphila) - Remove an destrow infested plants. If striped or spotted cucumber beetles appear, control as early as possible. Powdery mildew - avoid wetting foliage if possible. Water early in the day so that above ground parts of the plants dry as quickly as possible. Avoid crowding plants and eliminate weeds around plants and garden area to improve air circulation. Viral disease - remove and destroy entire infested plant along with immediately surrounding soil and soil clinging to roots.

Carbohydrate, Potassium, Vitamin AFood
88Squash, Pattypans, SunburstCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)7Direct sow or transplant in late May or early June once the soil is warm. For transplants, start seeds indoors during the first two weeks of May. Make sure plants are in the ground no later than June 15th. Optimal soil temperature: 25-35°C (68-95°F). Seeds should germinate in 7-14 days.

Sow seeds 2cm (1") deep. Sow 3 seeds in each spot where you want a plant to grow, and thin to the strongest plant. Space summer squash 45-60cm (18-24") apart in rows 90-120cm (36-48") apart. Give winter squash and pumpkins even more room with a minimum of 90-120cm (36-48") apart in rows 120-180cm (48-72") apart.

In optimal conditions at least 80% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 2 years. Per 100' row: 180 seeds, per acre: 15M seeds.
60Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. These big plants need lots of food. Use 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer worked into the soil beneath each plant. All squash grow male flowers first, at later female flowers. The female flowers have tiny fruits at the base of their petals and require pollination by bees mostly. Incomplete pollination often happens at the beginning of the season, and results in misshapen fruits that are withered at the flower end. Just discard these damaged fruits before they begin to rot. You can encourage bees to your garden by growing Phacelia or Buckwheat for improved pollination.full sunrich2 gramsVivid deep yellow pattypans look like jewels nestling in a big bush. These dazzling miniatures are best picked at 5cm (2"). Steam them whole for a treat.

The three species of squash that we offer represent a wide variety of shapes and colours. Each will cross-polliinate readily whithin their species. For instance, all C. pepo will cross-pollinate with each other, but not with C. maxima or C. moschata. For people who want to save their seeds, this is a very important consideration. The fruits themselves will not be affected by cross pollination, but the seeds inside will be, so squash need to be grown in isolation from other members of their species if seed saving is the goal.

Summer Squash: pick when small, if fruit gets big the plant stops producing. Check the plants regularly!

Winter Squash: Fruit is ripe if your thumbnail doesn't mark the skin and the stem is dry and brown. Cut the stem about 4cm (2") from the fruit. Squash survive a light frost, but store better if harvested before frost.

Storage: Field-cure for 10 days in the sun, or cure indoors in a warm room for 4 or 5 days. To prevent mould sponge the skins with a solution of 10 parts water to 1 part chlorine bleach. Store at 10-15ºC (50-60ºF) with low humidity with good air circulation. Try on a shelf in the garage.

Bacterial wilt (Erwinia tracheiphila) - Remove an destrow infested plants. If striped or spotted cucumber beetles appear, control as early as possible. Powdery mildew - avoid wetting foliage if possible. Water early in the day so that above ground parts of the plants dry as quickly as possible. Avoid crowding plants and eliminate weeds around plants and garden area to improve air circulation. Viral disease - remove and destroy entire infested plant along with immediately surrounding soil and soil clinging to roots.
PotassiumFood
12Squash, Red Kuri; Japanese Red Kuri Squash; Hokkaido Squash; Baby Red Hubbard; Uchiki KuriCucurbitaceaeCucurbita maxima (dg fo pf wp)Standard vegetable culture. Prepare a rich hill and direct seed 5 seeds per hill, then thin to the best 3 seedlings. Allow the plants to sprangle. Give them plenty of room -- they will extend at least 5 feet in every direction, unless you train them to do otherwise, which by the way can be done. Water deeply twice a week.15 eachNative to Mesoamarica and grown worldwide. We found this squash to be gratifyingly vigorous and pest resistant, and it gave more food value per square foot than just about anything else we grew in the garden. The flea beetles did go after the seedlings right when the ground warmed up in the early summer, but we spread some neem seed meal around the plants and on the young leaves and this saved them. I think some of the seedlings would have made it through without treatment, but I was already salivating, so didn't push my luck. The plants doubled in size every day or two. It was amazing to watch them grow. Good compost, I guess (thanks to Kalesh). Each vine bore 3 (more or less) bright globular fruits, and since we saved three plants per hill, that gave 9 squashes per hill, which was a lot. But it was not too many -- we ate them all! This is our favorite squash. We like to split it, scoop out the insides (which is really easy to do, given the shape) and bake the halves in the oven until done. As the squash cooks, it creates its own sugary glaze. We find it unnecessary to augment the natural nuttiness and sweetness with any oily or sugary additive. We like to eat these as they are, but we also like to make them into pumpkin pies. We think they make the best of all pumpkin pies, not only because they are particularly tasty, but because the flesh is dry, meaty, and stringless, and reconstitutes admirably well inside a pie shell. (Too much water in squash used to make pumpkin pies is a real no no.) We found that our's were harvestable before frost and didn't need to be stored to develop sugar. But the standard method with squash is to harvest after the first light frost, wash with cold water and sun dry, then put into cool, dry storage. Another option is to go into a baking frenzy and bake the fruits and then smash the clean flesh into freezer containers and freeze for later use. We like to freeze them in 3 cup baggies, just enough to make 2 pumpkin pies, or augment a winter dinner.PotassiumFood, Veterinary
212Squash, SpaghettiCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)14Seed - sow early to mid spring in a greenhouse in a rich soil. Germination should take place within 2 weeks. Sow 2 or 3 seeds per pot and thin out to the best plant. Grow them on fast and plant out after the last expected frosts, giving them cloche or frame protection for at least their first few weeks if you are trying them outdoors.Cultivated Beds;sun or partial shademoist16 eachFrom harvest 2010PotassiumAnthelmintic, Food, Veterinary
213Squash, Summer, straight neckCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)46full sun2450 eachOrganic. Smooth bright yellow summer squash. Compact bush plants yield belicious squash which add color and flavour to summer dishes. Food
215Squash, Winter, small striped delicataCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)14Seed - sow early to mid spring in a greenhouse in a rich soil. Germination should take place within 2 weeks. Sow 2 or 3 seeds per pot and thin out to the best plant. Grow them on fast and plant out after the last expected frosts, giving them cloche or frame protection for at least their first few weeks if you are trying them outdoors.Cultivated Beds;sun or partial shademoist135 eachPotassiumFood
270Watermelon, Crimson SweetCucurbitaceaeCitrullus lanatus (dg fo pf wp)7Sow indoors 3 weeks before last frost date in gallon pots and transplant. Or, seed directly in the garden once the soil has truly warmed up. Plant 1/2 inch deep and tamp securely. Germ in one week. Thin or transplant to 3 plants per hill, and space hills at least 6 feet apart. Watermelon require plenty of room to grow!80full sunwell drainedrich21 eachAnnual vine bearing large oblong fruits ranging in weight from 10 to 30 lbs, sometimes more. Watermelon prefers rich, sandy soil and does best in the full sun. When preparing pots for starting our's, I mixed 50% pure compost with 50% sand, and when I thinned the seedlings, noticed a vigorous branching root system after a little more than a week. A good sign. When transplanting the seeds, they tended to stick to my fingers, also a good sign, because they are covered with residual sugar, a sweet memory of last year's crop. Moon and stars is an heirloom classic -- large fruited, with very sweet red flesh and an outer skin that is dark green with yellow markings that resemble the moon and the stars shining out from the dark firmament. I don't know about you, but I don't trust a watermelon that doesn't make seeds. I like to be able to collect seeds and replant them year after year. I like to engage in watermelion seed spitting contests, which I swear I once won, if only we could've found the seed. I like red fleshed watermelons best of all. I've tried all the different kinds, and I think moon and stars are the best. We direct seeded our's second week of June and we were eating watermelons by Labor day, and still eating watermelons on Oct 1. My friend Charlie in Bath Co. Kentucky planted the same lot of seeds and he got 30 lb fruits, bigger than what we accomplished here in the mountains of Southern Oregon. So judging by this I'd say this watermelon works in a wide range of climates. We offer a big packet for a small price.
85Watermelon, Moon and StarsCucurbitaceaeCitrullus lanatus (dg fo pf wp)7Sow indoors 3 weeks before last frost date in gallon pots and transplant. Or, seed directly in the garden once the soil has truly warmed up. Plant 1/2 inch deep and tamp securely. Germ in one week. Thin or transplant to 3 plants per hill, and space hills at least 6 feet apart. Watermelon require plenty of room to grow!65full sunwell drainedrich20 eachAnnual vine bearing large oblong fruits ranging in weight from 10 to 30 lbs, sometimes more. Watermelon prefers rich, sandy soil and does best in the full sun. When preparing pots for starting our's, I mixed 50% pure compost with 50% sand, and when I thinned the seedlings, noticed a vigorous branching root system after a little more than a week. A good sign. When transplanting the seeds, they tended to stick to my fingers, also a good sign, because they are covered with residual sugar, a sweet memory of last year's crop. Moon and stars is an heirloom classic -- large fruited, with very sweet red flesh and an outer skin that is dark green with yellow markings that resemble the moon and the stars shining out from the dark firmament. I don't know about you, but I don't trust a watermelon that doesn't make seeds. I like to be able to collect seeds and replant them year after year. I like to engage in watermelion seed spitting contests, which I swear I once won, if only we could've found the seed. I like red fleshed watermelons best of all. I've tried all the different kinds, and I think moon and stars are the best. We direct seeded our's second week of June and we were eating watermelons by Labor day, and still eating watermelons on Oct 1. My friend Charlie in Bath Co. Kentucky planted the same lot of seeds and he got 30 lb fruits, bigger than what we accomplished here in the mountains of Southern Oregon. So judging by this I'd say this watermelon works in a wide range of climates. We offer a big packet for a small price.Food
273Watermelon, Red Little Baby Flower F1CucurbitaceaeCitrullus lanatus (dg fo pf wp)7Sow indoors 3 weeks before last frost date in gallon pots and transplant. Or, seed directly in the garden once the soil has truly warmed up. Plant 1/2 inch deep and tamp securely. Germ in one week. Thin or transplant to 3 plants per hill, and space hills at least 6 feet apart. Watermelon require plenty of room to grow!70full sunwell drainedrich30 eachAnnual vine bearing large oblong fruits ranging in weight from 10 to 30 lbs, sometimes more. Watermelon prefers rich, sandy soil and does best in the full sun. When preparing pots for starting our's, I mixed 50% pure compost with 50% sand, and when I thinned the seedlings, noticed a vigorous branching root system after a little more than a week. A good sign. When transplanting the seeds, they tended to stick to my fingers, also a good sign, because they are covered with residual sugar, a sweet memory of last year's crop. Moon and stars is an heirloom classic -- large fruited, with very sweet red flesh and an outer skin that is dark green with yellow markings that resemble the moon and the stars shining out from the dark firmament. I don't know about you, but I don't trust a watermelon that doesn't make seeds. I like to be able to collect seeds and replant them year after year. I like to engage in watermelion seed spitting contests, which I swear I once won, if only we could've found the seed. I like red fleshed watermelons best of all. I've tried all the different kinds, and I think moon and stars are the best. We direct seeded our's second week of June and we were eating watermelons by Labor day, and still eating watermelons on Oct 1. My friend Charlie in Bath Co. Kentucky planted the same lot of seeds and he got 30 lb fruits, bigger than what we accomplished here in the mountains of Southern Oregon. So judging by this I'd say this watermelon works in a wide range of climates. We offer a big packet for a small price.
274Watermelon, Sugar BabyCucurbitaceaeCitrullus lanatus (dg fo pf wp)7Sow indoors 3 weeks before last frost date in gallon pots and transplant. Or, seed directly in the garden once the soil has truly warmed up. Plant 1/2 inch deep and tamp securely. Germ in one week. Thin or transplant to 3 plants per hill, and space hills at least 6 feet apart. Watermelon require plenty of room to grow!80full sunwell drainedrich20 eachAnnual vine bearing large oblong fruits ranging in weight from 10 to 30 lbs, sometimes more. Watermelon prefers rich, sandy soil and does best in the full sun. When preparing pots for starting our's, I mixed 50% pure compost with 50% sand, and when I thinned the seedlings, noticed a vigorous branching root system after a little more than a week. A good sign. When transplanting the seeds, they tended to stick to my fingers, also a good sign, because they are covered with residual sugar, a sweet memory of last year's crop. Moon and stars is an heirloom classic -- large fruited, with very sweet red flesh and an outer skin that is dark green with yellow markings that resemble the moon and the stars shining out from the dark firmament. I don't know about you, but I don't trust a watermelon that doesn't make seeds. I like to be able to collect seeds and replant them year after year. I like to engage in watermelion seed spitting contests, which I swear I once won, if only we could've found the seed. I like red fleshed watermelons best of all. I've tried all the different kinds, and I think moon and stars are the best. We direct seeded our's second week of June and we were eating watermelons by Labor day, and still eating watermelons on Oct 1. My friend Charlie in Bath Co. Kentucky planted the same lot of seeds and he got 30 lb fruits, bigger than what we accomplished here in the mountains of Southern Oregon. So judging by this I'd say this watermelon works in a wide range of climates. We offer a big packet for a small price.
87Zucchini, Black BeautyCucurbitaceaeCucurbita pepo (dg fo pf wp)7Direct sow or transplant in late May or early June when soil is warm. For transplants, start seeds indoors during the first two weeks of May. Optimal soil temperature for germination: 25-35°C (68-95°F). Seeds should sprout in 7-14 days.

Sow seeds 2cm (1") deep. Sow 3 seeds in each spot you want a plant to grow and thin to the strongest one. Aim to space zucchinis no less than 45-60cm (18-24") apart in rows 90-120cm (36-48") apart.


In optimal conditions at least 80% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 2 years. Per 100' row: 180 seeds, per acre: 15M seeds.
60Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. These big, fast-growing plants need plenty of moisture and lots of food. Grow them in rich, well-drained soil in full sun. Dig finished compost or well-rotted manure into the beds, and dig in 1 cup of complete organic fertilizer beneath each transplant. Water the soil around them when you irrigate, and always avoid overhead watering, as wet leaves will attract diseases like mildew. Keep weeded. Misshapen or withered fruits can result from incomplete pollination. Make sure to remove these from the plants as you see them, before they begin to rot, and put them in the compost.

In the home garden it can be tempting to over-plant zucchinis. One well-grown plant will provide enough fruits for the average family. Instead of planting several zuccinis, use that space for other vegetables.

Pick regularly to encourage the plant to keep on fruiting. Zucchini leaves are often very prickly, so pull delicate skinned fruit out carefully. Fully mature zucchini have a hard skin: chickens like them.

Zucchinis that are grown in good soil in full sun will have few problems. One common complaint is the development of powdery mildew on the leaves. This begins to show up in mid-summer as grey patches on the leaves and stems, and it literally is mildew. It results from excess moisture, and can be prevented or minimized by avoiding overhead watering at all times. Try to water plants early in the day, and only water the soil around them. Avoid over-crowding plants to improve air circulation around them. Leaves that are badly affected by mildew can be removed, but throw them in the garbage, not the compost.
full sunmoistrich5 gramsHEIRLOOM! The standard summer squash, introduced in the 1920s. Compact everbearing bush plants are loaded with glossy green/black fruits with firm white flesh. Best eaten when under 20cm (8" long). The best variety for freezing. Black Beauty zucchini won the All American Selections prize back in 1957! True zucchinis are evenly narrow along their length, and they are long - never round. We include summer pumpkins here as "round zucchinis" because they are so similar in growth habit and usefulness. Zucchinis that develop a bulbous end where the seed cavity forms, are referred to as Cocozelle types. At the end of the day, all are very productive summer squash.Food

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Agavaceae, Aizoaceae, Alliaceae, Amaranthaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Araliaceae, Asteraceae, Boraginaceae, Brassicaceae, Campanulaceae, Caprifoliaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Crassulaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Elaeagnaceae, Ephedraceae, Ericaceae, Fabaceae, Fagaceae, Hamamelidaceae, Hyacinthaceae, Hypericaceae, Lamiaceae, Lythraceae, Malvaceae, Myricaceae, Onagraceae, Papaveraceae, Poaceae, Polygonaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, Rubiaceae, Saururaceae, Schisandraceae, Scrophulariaceae, Solanaceae, Tropaeolaceae, Valerianaceae, Verbenaceae, Vitaceae
have a specific use
Adaptogen, Alterative, Analgesic, Anaphrodisiac, Anodyne, Anthelmintic, Antibacterial, Anticholesterolemic, Antidepressant, Antidermatosic, Antidote, Antiecchymotic, Antiemetic, Antifungal, Antiinflammatory, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, Antiperiodic, Antiphlogistic, Antipruritic, Antipyretic, Antirheumatic, Antiscorbutic, Antiscrophulatic, Antiseptic, Antispasmodic, Antitumor, Antitussive, Antiviral, Anxiolytic, Aperient, Aphrodisiac, Appetizer, Aromatherapy, Astringent, Basketry, Beads, Beverage, Bitter, Bronchiodilator, Cancer, Cardiac, Cardiotonic, Carminative, Cathartic, Charcoal, Cholagogue, Compost, Contraceptive, Cosmetic, Curdling agent, Demulcent, Deobstruent, Depurative, Detergent, Diaphoretic, Digestive, Diuretic, Dye, Emetic, Emmenagogue, Emollient, Essential, Expectorant, Febrifuge, Fibre, Flavouring, Food, Forage, Fragrance, Fuel, Fungicide, Galactogogue, Green manure, Haemostatic, Hedge, Hepatic, Homeopathy, Hypnotic, Hypoglycaemic, Hypotensive, Immunomodulator, Immunostimulant, Infertility, Insect Repellant, Insectiary, Insecticide, Kidney, Latex, Laxative, Lithontripic, Litmus, Mordant, Mouthwash, Mulch, Narcotic, Nervine, Nutritive, Oil, Oneirogen, Ophthalmic, Ornamental, Parasiticide, Pectoral, Pioneer, Pipes, Pollution, Poultice, Purgative, Refrigerant, Restorative, Rubefacient, Sacrificial, Salve, Seasoning, Sedative, Shelterbelt, Sialagogue, Skin, Soil stabilization, Sternutatory, Stimulant, Stings, Stomachic, Strewing, Stuffing, Sweetening, Tannin, TB, Tonic, Uterine tonic, Vasodilator, Vermifuge, Veterinary, Vulnerary, Warts, Waterproofing, Wood
are sensitive to a particular nutrient
Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Zinc
supplies a particular nutrient (dynamic accumulator)
Antioxidants, Boron, Calcium, Carbohydrate, Chromium, Copper, Fat, Fat: Omega-3, Fibre: Non-Soluble, Folate, Iodine, Iron, Lycopene, Magnesium, Manganese, Niacin, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Potassium, Protein, Silica, Sulfur, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Zinc

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