Apiaceae

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Apiaceae
Celery or Carrot family, formerly Umbelliferae

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Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for Apiaceae:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
89Carrot, Nutri-RedApiaceaeDaucus carota (dg fo pf wp)2013-06-10 00:00:00100 metres seeds in outdoor soilplant7Direct sow April to mid-July for harvests from July to November. Sow at 3 week intervals for a continuous harvest. Optimal soil temperature: 7-30°C (45-85°F). Seeds take as long as 14-21 days to germinate.

Because carrot seeds are tiny, they need to be sown shallowly. The trick is to keep the top-most layer of soil damp during the long germination period. Water deeply prior to planting. Direct sow the tiny seeds 5mm (¼") deep, 4 seeds per 2cm (1"), and firm soil lightly after seeding. Make sure the seeds are only just buried. Water the area with the gentlest stream you can provide, and keep it constantly moist until the seeds sprout.

In optimal conditions at least 60% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 3 years. Per 100' row: 2.4M seeds, per acre: 1,044M seeds. Rates are for raw, not pelleted seeds.
76The softer and more humus-based the soil, the better. When soil is dry enough in spring, work it to a fine texture. Broadcast and dig in ½ cup complete organic fertilizer for every 3m (10') of row. Avoid fresh manure. Carrots will become misshapen, but still edible if they hit anything hard as they grow down into the soil. Keep weeded and watered. It is very important to thin carrots in order to allow them room to grow, and so they don't compete for available nutrients, moisture, and light. Then to 4-10cm (1½-4") when the young plants are 2cm (1") tall. Use wider spacing to get larger roots. As they grow, carrots push up, out of the soil, so hill soil up to prevent getting a green shoulder.full sunwell drainedsandy67 eachCarrots are second only to beets in sugar content, and they're packed with beta carotene, vitamins, minerals, and fibre. They also happen to be delicious and easy to grow!

Very flavourful, striking red carrots that are meant to be cooked rather than eaten raw. This variety is extremely high in lycopene, the same antioxidant found in tomatoes. The colour actually increases when cooked, and the lycopene becomes more accessible to the body. Slender, red, gourmet carrots to 23cm (9") in length.

Carrots can be harvested at any size, but flavour is best when the carrot has turned bright orange. After harvest, store at cold temperatures just above 0ºC. You can store in sand or sawdust, or simply leave carrots under heaped soil in the garden during the winter, and pull as you need them.

The Carrot Rust Fly - This pest lays its eggs at the base of the growing carrots. The larva of the fly chews tunnels and unsightly grooves through the surface of the root, causing rot. Unfortunately the damage isn't just cosmetic; the activities of the Carrot Rust Fly larva changes the flavour of the carrot and makes it quite inedible. Use our floating row cover to keep the adults away from the carrots. Plant after the beginning of June to avoid the first and worst infestation period. The good news for apartment dwellers who want to grow carrots on their balconies is the Carrot Rust Fly is not a good flyer. It is unlikely to infest their high-rise crop.

Wireworm - These are the larva of click beetles. They are about an inch and a half long, slender and reddish brown. When squeezed they turn as rigid as a wire, hence the name. Wireworms chew irregular holes through roots, making the carrots inedible. Wireworms prefer a moist soil so preparing your carrot bed so that it is well drained will help. Interplanting with mustard leaf is an excellent way to discourage wireworm damage. The flavour of the mustard is one deterrent, and mustard also helps to dry out the soil, forcing the wireworm away from the roots.

Predatory nematodes are an effective control for both Carrot Rust Fly and wireworm. Apply generously in the spring when the larva of both pests is most active.

Vitamin AFood
99Carrot, Purple DragonApiaceaeDaucus carota (dg fo pf wp)7Direct sow April to mid-July for harvests from July to November. Sow at 3 week intervals for a continuous harvest. Optimal soil temperature: 7-30°C (45-85°F). Seeds take as long as 14-21 days to germinate.

Because carrot seeds are tiny, they need to be sown shallowly. The trick is to keep the top-most layer of soil damp during the long germination period. Water deeply prior to planting. Direct sow the tiny seeds 5mm (¼") deep, 4 seeds per 2cm (1"), and firm soil lightly after seeding. Make sure the seeds are only just buried. Water the area with the gentlest stream you can provide, and keep it constantly moist until the seeds sprout.

In optimal conditions at least 60% of seeds will germinate. Usual seed life: 3 years. Per 100' row: 2.4M seeds, per acre: 1,044M seeds. Rates are for raw, not pelleted seeds.
60Ideal pH: 6.0-6.8. The softer and more humus-based the soil, the better. When soil is dry enough in spring, work it to a fine texture. Broadcast and dig in ½ cup complete organic fertilizer for every 3m (10') of row. Avoid fresh manure. Carrots will become misshapen, but still edible if they hit anything hard as they grow down into the soil. Keep weeded and watered. It is very important to thin carrots in order to allow them room to grow, and so they don't compete for available nutrients, moisture, and light. Then to 4-10cm (1½-4") when the young plants are 2cm (1") tall. Use wider spacing to get larger roots. As they grow, carrots push up, out of the soil, so hill soil up to prevent getting a green shoulder.full sunwell drainedrich50 gramsDragons have dark red to purple skins, but a regular orange carrot interior. Packed with nutrients, Dragons look great raw or cooked.

Carrots are second only to beets in sugar content, and they're packed with beta carotene, vitamins, minerals, and fibre. They also happen to be delicious and easy to grow!

Carrots can be harvested at any size, but flavour is best when the carrot has turned bright orange. After harvest, store at cold temperatures just above 0ºC. You can store in sand or sawdust, or simply leave carrots under heaped soil in the garden during the winter, and pull as you need them.

The Carrot Rust Fly - This pest lays its eggs at the base of the growing carrots. The larva of the fly chews tunnels and unsightly grooves through the surface of the root, causing rot. Unfortunately the damage isn't just cosmetic; the activities of the Carrot Rust Fly larva changes the flavour of the carrot and makes it quite inedible. Use our floating row cover to keep the adults away from the carrots. Plant after the beginning of June to avoid the first and worst infestation period. The good news for apartment dwellers who want to grow carrots on their balconies is the Carrot Rust Fly is not a good flyer. It is unlikely to infest their high-rise crop.

Wireworm - These are the larva of click beetles. They are about an inch and a half long, slender and reddish brown. When squeezed they turn as rigid as a wire, hence the name. Wireworms chew irregular holes through roots, making the carrots inedible. Wireworms prefer a moist soil so preparing your carrot bed so that it is well drained will help. Interplanting with mustard leaf is an excellent way to discourage wireworm damage. The flavour of the mustard is one deterrent, and mustard also helps to dry out the soil, forcing the wireworm away from the roots.

Predatory nematodes are an effective control for both Carrot Rust Fly and wireworm. Apply generously in the spring when the larva of both pests is most active.

Magnesium, PotassiumFood
188Carrots, Purple HazeApiaceaeDaucus carota (dg fo pf wp)7950 eachDeep purple on the outside, but bright orange inside. The sweet tasting roots gracefully taper to 25cm long. Purple Haze was an AAS winner in 2006 and one of the most nutritious carrot varieties available. Easy and different!Magnesium, Potassium, Vitamin AFood
22ChervilApiaceaeAnthriscus cerefolium (dg fo pf wp)Direct seed in the spring garden. Cutting back regularly and sowing in succession will keep chervil herb coming to the tabvle throughout the season. Very fast to make edible leaf.Prefers a cool, moist location where it will put on a great deal of green herb without bolting.100 eachHardiness: The plant will perform well in any garden in the summertime and is a good winter crop in maritime gardens or in the winter greenhouse, even if the greenhouse is unheated.

Hardy annual native to Europe, growing to about 12 inches and with a mounding habit. Chervil has a reputation of repelling slugs. The plants are petite and the flavor is very fine. It is a gourmet parsley-like plant that is used in seasoning vegetables, meat dishes, omelettes, soups, and for making salad dressing.

This is a culinary herb that is also used as a diuretic and blood-purifier and carminative (digestive agent).

The herb is experiencing a renaissance of popularity, and is very saleable in salad mixes or as a plant in a pot.
Carminative, Diuretic, Insect Repellant, Seasoning
23Cilantro; Coriander; Thai ParsleyApiaceaeCoriandrum sativum (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-07 00:00:00520 each seeds in 8cc blocksplantSow directly in the garden bed. Germination can be a bit cranky, so be patient. Sow starting in the early spring, in successions 3 weeks apart, in order to assure ongoing availability of the fresh herb.30Plant prefers full sun and regular garden soil.full sungarden200 eachAnnual. 30 days to cilantro, 60 days to coriander.

Harvest the shining, smooth leaves before the plant flowers for use as the culinary spice Cilantro in cooking and in salsa. Harvest the seeds and use them as Coriander, a curry ingredient and also a respected medicinal herb.

Medicinally, the fresh or dried herb and seeds chelate heavy metals and help move them out of the body—this includes mercury and lead. The seeds are especially stimulant, aromatic and carminative. Combine fresh green coriander seeds with spilanthes buds and extract together in alcohol for a mouthwash experience that surpasses everything with the possible exception of a crisp ripe apple right off the tree. Interestingly, we invented this combination spontaneously and only later found out that coriander helps the body chelate mercury that might be seeping from old fillings.

RECIPE FOR CHELATION SALSA Here’s our recipe for “Chelation Salsa” 2 cups chopped fresh cilantro 2 cups chopped fresh tomato 1 cup chopped fresh basil ½ cup chopped pumpkin seeds 4 cloves garlic, chopped and pressed Hot peppers to taste 1 TBS lemon juice 2 TBS olive oil

Salt to taste
Carminative, Seasoning, Stimulant
3Dang-gui; Tang-kuei; Dong-quaiApiaceaeAngelica sinensis (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-26 00:00:00116 each seeds in 8cc blocksplantSow seed in fall or early spring, on surface of soil, and press in well, and keep moist until germination. Cold soil germinator. Very trustworthy seed.

Seed best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe since the seed only has a short viability. Seed can also be sown in the spring, though germination rates will be lower. It requires light for germination. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter, planting them out into their permanent positions in the spring. The seed can also be sow in situ as soon as it is ripe.

Requires a deep moist fertile soil in dappled shade or full sun. This species is not fully hardy in colder areas, tolerating temperatures down to at least -5°c. Plants are reliably perennial if they are prevented from setting seed.
Plant prefers part shade and moist soils.sun or partial shademoistgardenHardy to all temperate zones. Herbaceous monocarp native to China. Deeply cut leaves unfold from the meaty crown, subtended by the characteristically smoky smelling root, giving rise to the flowers that unfold and adorn the plant in late fall and sometimes make their seed after winter has commenced.

One of the most useful women's herbs of all times -- balances and regulates hormones. Dang Gui is a well-known Chinese herb that has been used in the treatment of female ailments for thousands of years. Its reputation is perhaps second only to ginseng (Panax ginseng) and it is particularly noted for its 'blood tonic' effects on women.

The root has a sweet pungent aroma that is very distinctive and it is often used in cooking, which is the best way to take it as a blood tonic. One report says that the root contains vitamin B12 and can be used in the treatment of pernicious anaemia. It is commonly used in the treatment of a wide range of women's complaints where it regulates the menstrual cycle and relieves period pain and also to ensure a healthy pregnancy and easy delivery.

However conflicting information suggests it should not be used during pregnancy and should not be used if menstrual flow is heavy or during menstration. It is an ideal tonic for women with heavy menstruation who risk becoming anaemic. The water-soluble and non-volatile elements of the root increase the contraction of the uterus whilst the volatile elements can relax the muscle of the uterus. Its use prevents the decrease of liver glycogen and protects the liver. Used for menopausal symptoms (hot flushes).

It has an antibacterial action, inhibiting the growth of various bacteria including Bacillus dysenteriae, Bacillus typhi, B. comma, B. cholerae and haemolytic streptococci.

The root is an ingredient of 'Four Things Soup', the most widely used woman's tonic in China. The other species used are Rehmannia glutinosa, Ligusticum wallichii and Paeonia lactiflora.

The root is harvested in the autumn or winter and dried for later use. It has been used to treat pulmonary hypertension in combination with the allopathic medication nifedipine. Other uses include: constipation (a laxative), trauma injuries, ulcers, rheumatism and malaria.
Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin)Alterative, Analgesic, Anticholesterolemic, Antiinflammatory, Antispasmodic, Deobstruent, Emollient, Hepatic, Laxative, Ornamental, Seasoning, Sedative, Vasodilator
241DillApiaceaeAnethum graveolens (dg fo pf wp)0 eachSeasoning
34Gotu Kola; BrahmiApiaceaeHydrocotyl asiatica (dg fo pf wp)30Gotu kola is actually somewhat difficult to start from seed. Remember, it is a pioneer successional plant, with seeds that may remain dormant in the soil for decades until the right conditions occur for germination. Use a very well-draining mix (I've had zero germination in pots containing regular potting soil, except for one seed that was pinched between two pots and sprouted there -- clearly a situation of "excellent drainage." So, the best approach is to plant in greenhouse conditions in very excellently drained soil, just pressed into the surface of the soil, in which case the seeds will probably germinate in 30 to 90 days. Seed sown in the unheated greenhouse in the fall may give substantially better germination rates, but the germination time is likely to be up to 6 months. Division is simple at any time in the growing season, though the spring is probably best. We find that it is best to pot up the divisions until they are rooting away well, though in selected mild gardens it should be possible to plant the divisions out directly into their permanent positions.Old stone walls and rocky sunny places in lowland hills and especially by the coast in central and southern Japan. Shady, damp and wet places such as paddy fields, and in grass thickets.sun or partial shademoistpoor50 eachGotu kola is an outstandingly important medicinal herb. Its Indian name is 'Brahmi' which means 'bringing knowledge of the Supreme Reality' and it has long been used there medicinally and as an aid to meditation.

It is a useful tonic and cleansing herb for skin problems and digestive disorders. In India it is chiefly valued as a revitalizing herb that strengthens nervous function and memory.

The whole plant is alterative, cardio-depressant, hypotensive, weakly sedative and tonic. It is a rejuvenating diuretic herb that clears toxins, reduces inflammations and fevers, improves healing and immunity, improves the memory and has a balancing effect on the nervous system.

It has been suggested that regular use of the herb can rejuvenate the nervous system and it therefore deserves attention as a possible cure for a wide range of nervous disorders including multiple sclerosis. Recent research has shown that gotu kola reduces scarring, improves circulatory problems in the lower limbs and speeds the healing process.

It is used internally in the treatment of wounds, chronic skin conditions (including leprosy), venereal diseases, malaria, varicose veins, ulcers, nervous disorders and senility.

Externally, the herb is applied to wounds, haemorrhoids and rheumatic joints.

The plant can be harvested at any time of the year, fresh or dried. Some report the dried herb quickly loses its medicinal properties and so is best used fresh.
Adaptogen, Antiinflammatory, Cardiac, Depurative, Diuretic, Febrifuge, Hypotensive, Nervine, Sedative, Skin, Tonic
42Khella; Toothpick PlantApiaceaeAmmi visnaga (dg fo pf wp)Sow in spring.110Plant prefers full sun, regular watering, average soil.full sunmoist300 eachNative to the Mediterranean. Bears astoundingly long-lasting white umbels, as big as saucers, like a Queen Anne's Lace on steroids. Of course as a certified organic farm we don't put these plants on steroids, and would be willing to testify before congress that we don't, the plants are just naturally large flowered. Tincture or tea of the seeds is a non-stimulating bronchial and vasodilator that is used for treatment of asthma and coronary arteriosclerosis.Bronchiodilator, Ornamental, Vasodilator
48LovageApiaceaeLevisticum officinalis (dg fo pf wp)7Press seed into surface of soil fall or spring and keep moist until germination, which takes from 1 to 3 weeks. Thin or transplant to 2 feet apart.The plant prefers full sun to part shade and moist garden soils.sun or partial shademoist100 eachHerbaceous perennial flowering from 4 to 7 feet tall.

The leaf stems and leaves, harvested fresh and chopped, make an agreeably aromatic potherb, especially nice to flavor potato-leek soup. The aerial parts may be dried and rubbed through a screen to create seasoning flakes that may be used throughout the winter.

The root of this tasty herb is proestrogenic, and may be used as a substitute for Dang-gui (Angelica sinensis), although Lovage is a milder medicine and not as potent in its activity. Still, the herb is well liked by the women folks, and gentle is good.
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Antioxidants, Boron, Calcium, Carbohydrate, Chromium, Copper, Fat, Fat: Omega-3, Fibre: Non-Soluble, Folate, Iodine, Iron, Lycopene, Magnesium, Manganese, Niacin, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Potassium, Protein, Silica, Sulfur, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Zinc

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