Alliaceae

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Alliaceae
Onion and Garlic family

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Inventory

Here is EcoReality's seed inventory for Alliaceae:

IDcommon namefamilylatin namedatequantityactiondays to germpropagationdays to maturityhabitatsundrainagesoilinventorynotesnutrientsneedsuse
321garlic, hard neckAlliaceaeAllium sativum (dg fo pf wp)2013-11-05 00:00:00420 each seeds in outdoor soilplantcultivated bedsfull sunwell drainedloamSucceeds in most soils but prefers a sunny position in a moist light well-drained soil[1, 14, 16, 37]. Dislikes very acid soils[206]. Tolerates a pH in the range 4.5 to 8.3. The bulb is liable to rot if grown in a wet soil[27, 52]. Hardy to at least -10°c[206]. The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply[1]. Garlic has a very long history of use as a food and a medicine[244]. It was given to the Egyptian labourers when building the pyramids because it was believed to confer strength and protect from disease, it was also widely used by the Romans[244]. It is widely cultivated in most parts of the world for its edible bulb, which is used mainly as a flavouring in foods. There are a number of named varieties[200]. Bulb formation occurs in response to increasing daylength and temperature[200]. It is also influenced by the temperature at which the cloves were stored prior to planting. Cool storage at temperatures between 0 and 10°c will hasten subsequent bulb formation, storage at above 25°c will delay or prevent bulb formation[200, 206]. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes[18, 20, 54]. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other[201]. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer[233].
204Leek, TadornaAlliaceaeAllium porrum (dg fo pf wp)2013-04-15 00:00:00400 each seeds in 8cc blocksdiscard0 eachFood
205Leek, VarnaAlliaceaeAllium porrum (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-06 00:00:00140 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant702600 eachCertified Organic

The ultimate summer leek! Perfect for baby gourmet leeks. Left to mature, the white stalks are up to 35cm long. Varna grows very quickly. An excellent substitute for onions in many spi^s and meals. Timing: for autumn harvest, sow seeds indoors Feb-March and transplant outside in May. For an overwintering crop, sow winter-hardy varieties from March to mid-June. Seeding: For transplants, sow seed 1cm deep 1cm apart in rows 7cm apart in your tray. Move seedlings when pencil thick to a trench 15cm deep and wide, and bury to the first leaf joint apart in rows that are 30-45cm. Direct sow after last frost to same plant and row spacing as transplants. Growing: Heavy but well-drained soils, not suitable for oinions, will grow leeks well. Winter leeks will supply the table from October-April. Seed specs: Canada no1 germination standard: 65%

Usual seed life 1 year.
Food
93Onion, Ailsa CraigAlliaceaeAllium cepa (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-04 00:00:00120 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant5Start indoors in February to mid-March, and transplant in April. Overwintering onions need to be started in early July, and transplanted by the middle of August, and will be ready in June. Scallions can be direct sown every 3 weeks from April to late August. Optimal soil temperature for germination: 21-25°C (70-75°F). Seeds will emerge in 6-12 days, depending on conditions.

Transplants are preferred for home gardeners. Sow 3 seeds 5mm-1cm (¼-½") deep in each cell of a 72-cell tray. Transplant as a clump, spacing each 12-15cm (5-6") apart in rows 45-75cm (18-30") apart. Scallions can be spaced at 2-5cm (1-2") apart in rows 15cm (6") apart.

In optimal conditions at least 75% of seeds should germinate. Usual seed life: 1 year. Per 100' row: 260 seeds (scallions 1.2M), per acre: 76M seeds (scallions 1,045M).
95Ideal pH: 5.5-6.5 (6.0-6.8 for scallions). Fertile and well-drained soil in full sun is essential. Add well-rotted compost and dig ½-1 cup copmlete organic fertilizer into the soil beneath each 3m (10') of row. Keep moisture high in the top 20-30cm (8-12") of soil. Most of the bulb should form on the surface of the soil, so don't transplant too deeply. Bulb size is dependent on the size of the tops: the bigger the tops, the bigger the bulb. Provide August-planted scallions with the frost protection of a cloche or heavy row cover by the end of October. Stop watering in the beginning of August to mature the bulbs in dry soil. After half the tops have fallen, push over the remainder, wait a week and lift the bulbs. Curing is essential for long storage. Spread bulbs out in the sun for about a week, covering them at night to protect from dew. When the outer layer of the onion changes from moist to dry and crisp, it is cured. If weather is poor, cure inside. Storage: Keep onions in mesh sacks or hang in braids so they get good ventilation, and hang sacks where air is dry and very cool, but not freezing. Check them regularly and remove any sprouting or rotting onions. Well-cured storage onions should keep until late spring.full sunmoistsandy5 gramsHuge, straw-yellow globes up to 20cm (8") in diameter! Firm, with mild, sweet flesh, Ailsa is a fairly good storer. Fine textured, excellent for salads and sandwiches. A customer favourite!

Choose sweet onion varieties for enjoying raw or cooked within a couple of months of harvest. Storage types keep much longer, and will last until the follwoing spring in the right conditions. All onions are photoperiodic - day length triggers bulbing. Our varieties are all "long day" types, suitable for northern US and Canada.

Botrytis blast and downy mildew are common leaf diseases. One starts with white spots and streaks, the other with purple-grey areas on leaves. Leaves wither from the top down and plants die prematurely. Separate the overwintered and spring crops because disease starts in older plants and moves to younger. Avoid overhead watering and plant in open sunny locations. Use lots of compost and practice strict sanitation and rotation procedures. Spraying with copper hydroxide every 7-14 days at the first sign of a problem may help prevent disease from spreading.

The pungent odour of onions repels many pests and also protects nearby garden vegetables.
Food, Seasoning
206Onion, Hybrid, yellow storageAlliaceaeAllium cepa (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-04 00:00:00230 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant5105full sun0 eachFood
94Onion, RedwingAlliaceaeAllium cepa (dg fo pf wp)2012-04-03 00:00:00200 each seeds in 8cc blocksplant5Start indoors in February to mid-March, and transplant in April. Overwintering onions need to be started in early July, and transplanted by the middle of August, and will be ready in June. Scallions can be direct sown every 3 weeks from April to late August. Optimal soil temperature for germination: 21-25°C (70-75°F). Seeds will emerge in 6-12 days, depending on conditions.

Transplants are preferred for home gardeners. Sow 3 seeds 5mm-1cm (¼-½") deep in each cell of a 72-cell tray. Transplant as a clump, spacing each 12-15cm (5-6") apart in rows 45-75cm (18-30") apart. Scallions can be spaced at 2-5cm (1-2") apart in rows 15cm (6") apart.

In optimal conditions at least 75% of seeds should germinate. Usual seed life: 1 year. Per 100' row: 260 seeds (scallions 1.2M), per acre: 76M seeds (scallions 1,045M).
110Ideal pH: 5.5-6.5 (6.0-6.8 for scallions). Fertile and well-drained soil in full sun is essential. Add well-rotted compost and dig ½-1 cup copmlete organic fertilizer into the soil beneath each 3m (10') of row. Keep moisture high in the top 20-30cm (8-12") of soil. Most of the bulb should form on the surface of the soil, so don't transplant too deeply. Bulb size is dependent on the size of the tops: the bigger the tops, the bigger the bulb. Provide August-planted scallions with the frost protection of a cloche or heavy row cover by the end of October.full sunwell drainedrich150 eachThe ultimate in a red-skinned storage onion, this one stores nearly as well as Copra. Redwing produces globe-shaped bulbs 7-10cm (3-4") across, with unique deep-red, glossy skins and strong tops. Red onions are milder than yellow ones.

Choose sweet onion varieties for enjoying raw or cooked within a couple of months of harvest. Storage types keep much longer, and will last until the follwoing spring in the right conditions. All onions are photoperiodic - day length triggers bulbing. Our varieties are all "long day" types, suitable for northern US and Canada.

Stop watering in the beginning of August to mature the bulbs in dry soil. After half the tops have fallen, push over the remainder, wait a week and lift the bulbs. Curing is essential for long storage. Spread bulbs out in the sun for about a week, covering them at night to protect from dew. When the outer layer of the onion changes from moist to dry and crisp, it is cured. If weather is poor, cure inside. Storage: Keep onions in mesh sacks or hang in braids so they get good ventilation, and hang sacks where air is dry and very cool, but not freezing. Check them regularly and remove any sprouting or rotting onions. Well-cured storage onions should keep until late spring.

Botrytis blast and downy mildew are common leaf diseases. One starts with white spots and streaks, the other with purple-grey areas on leaves. Leaves wither from the top down and plants die prematurely. Separate the overwintered and spring crops because disease starts in older plants and moves to younger. Avoid overhead watering and plant in open sunny locations. Use lots of compost and practice strict sanitation and rotation procedures. Spraying with copper hydroxide every 7-14 days at the first sign of a problem may help prevent disease from spreading.

The pungent odour of onions repels many pests and also protects nearby garden vegetables.
Food, Seasoning

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have a specific use
Adaptogen, Alterative, Analgesic, Anaphrodisiac, Anodyne, Anthelmintic, Antibacterial, Anticholesterolemic, Antidepressant, Antidermatosic, Antiecchymotic, Antiemetic, Antifungal, Antiinflammatory, Antiperiodic, Antiphlogistic, Antipruritic, Antipyretic, Antirheumatic, Antiscorbutic, Antiscrophulatic, Antiseptic, Antispasmodic, Antitumor, Antitussive, Aperient, Aphrodisiac, Appetizer, Aromatherapy, Astringent, Basketry, Beads, Beverage, Bitter, Bronchiodilator, Cancer, Cardiac, Cardiotonic, Carminative, Cathartic, Charcoal, Cholagogue, Compost, Cosmetic, Curdling agent, Demulcent, Deobstruent, Depurative, Detergent, Diaphoretic, Digestive, Diuretic, Dye, Emetic, Emmenagogue, Emollient, Essential, Expectorant, Febrifuge, Fibre, Flavouring, Food, Forage, Fragrance, Fuel, Fungicide, Galactogogue, Green manure, Haemostatic, Hedge, Hepatic, Homeopathy, Hypnotic, Hypoglycaemic, Hypotensive, Immunostimulant, Infertility, Insect Repellant, Insectiary, Insecticide, Kidney, Latex, Laxative, Lithontripic, Litmus, Mordant, Mouthwash, Mulch, Narcotic, Nervine, Nutritive, Oil, Oneirogen, Ophthalmic, Ornamental, Parasiticide, Pectoral, Pioneer, Pipes, Pollution, Poultice, Purgative, Refrigerant, Restorative, Rubefacient, Sacrificial, Salve, Seasoning, Sedative, Shelterbelt, Sialagogue, Skin, Soil stabilization, Sternutatory, Stimulant, Stings, Stomachic, Strewing, Stuffing, Sweetening, Tannin, TB, Tonic, Uterine tonic, Vasodilator, Vermifuge, Veterinary, Vulnerary, Warts, Waterproofing, Wood
are sensitive to a particular nutrient
Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Zinc
supplies a particular nutrient (dynamic accumulator)
Antioxidants, Boron, Calcium, Carbohydrate, Chromium, Copper, Fat, Fat: Omega-3, Fibre: Non-Soluble, Folate, Iodine, Iron, Lycopene, Magnesium, Manganese, Niacin, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Potassium, Protein, Silica, Sulfur, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), Vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Zinc

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